People

Title By Description Created Last modifiedsort descending
Harvey Leroy Karman (1924–2008) Rainey Horwitz Harvey Karman was an abortionist, inventor, and activist for safe abortion techniques in the US during the twentieth century. Karman developed the Karman cannula, a flexible soft tube used for vacuum aspiration abortions. Karman traveled extensively throughout the US to educate healthcare providers on how to administer safe abortions. He also traveled to Bangladesh, India, China, and other developing nations to promote safe and simple abortion techniques that anyone could perform without previous medical training. 2017-07-18 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Theophilus Shickel Painter (1889-1969) Dorothy Haskett Theophilus Shickel Painter studied the structure and function of chromosomes in the US during in the early to mid-twentieth century. Painter worked at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas. In the 1920s and 1930s, Painter studied the chromosomes of the salivary gland giant chromosomes of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), with Hermann J. Muller. Muller and Painter studied the ability of X-rays to cause changes in the chromosomes of fruit flies. Painter also studied chromosomes in mammals. 2014-11-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
George Linius Streeter (1873-1948) Kimberly A. Buettner George Linius Streeter was born on 12 January 1873 in Johnstown, New York, to Hannah Green Anthony and George Austin Streeter. He completed his undergraduate studies at Union College in 1895 and received his MD degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in 1899. At Columbia, Professor George S. Huntington sparked Streeter's interest in anatomy, and Streeter also interned at Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. He then went on to Albany to teach anatomy at the Albany Medical College and to work with neurologist Henry Hun. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Libbie Henrietta Hyman (1888-1969) Kristin Bolfert Libbie Henrietta Hyman was born into a recently immigrated Jewish family on 6 December 1888 in Des Moines, Iowa. One of many siblings and daughter to parents Sabina Neumann and Joseph Hyman, who did not particularly support her interests in science, Hyman excelled in school and indulged her interests in biology in her free time. From a young age, Hyman collected and cataloged flora around her home. Despite being valedictorian of her high school class, Hyman's first job was labeling cereal boxes in a local factory. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William P. Procter in car in front of Old Main Building Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Johann Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) Amanda Andrei Johann Gregor Mendel studied plants and their patterns of inheritance in Austria during the nineteenth century. Mendel experimented with the pea plant, Pisum, and his publication, 'Versuche uber Pflanzenhybriden' (“Experiments on Plant Hybridization”), published in 1866, revolutionized theories of trait inheritance. Mendel’s discoveries relating to factors, traits, and how they pass between generations of organisms enabled scientists in the twentieth century to build theories of genetics. 2013-07-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Barbara Seaman (1935–2008) Rainey Horwitz Barbara Seaman was a writer, investigator, and advocate for female healthcare rights during the twentieth century in the United States. Seaman’s work addressed the gendered prejudice she observed in the US healthcare system and argued that women of the 1960s lacked the proper tools to make informed decisions about pregnancy care, breastfeeding, childbirth, and contraception. Seaman wrote the book The Doctor’s Case Against the Pill in 1969 to expose the dangers in prescribing and consuming high doses of estrogen in the form of birth control. 2018-05-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Craig C. Mello (1960- ) Catherine May Craig C. Mello is an American developmental biologist and Nobel Laureate, who helped discover RNA interference (RNAi). Along with his colleague Andrew Fire, he developed gene knockouts using RNAi. In 006 Mello won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his contribution. Mello also contributed to developmental biology, focusing on gene regulation, cell signaling, cleavage formation, germline determination, cell migration, cell fate differentiation, and morphogenesis. 2011-11-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz and Sally Hughes Schrader Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1919 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stafford Leak Warren (1896–1981) Meilin Zhu Stafford Leak Warren studied nuclear medicine in the United States during the twentieth century. He used radiation to make images of the body for diagnosis or treatment and developed the mammogram, a breast imaging technique that uses low-energy X-rays to produce an image of breasts. Mammograms allow doctors to diagnose breast cancer in its early and most treatable stages. 2017-08-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
"The Development of the Pronephros during the Embryonic and Early Larval Life of the Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)" (1932), by Rachel L. Carson Karen Wellner Rachel L. Carson studied biology at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and graduated in 1933 with an MA upon the completion of her thesis, The Development of the Pronephros during the Embryonic and Early Larval Life of the Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The research that Carson conducted for this thesis project grounded many of the claims and observations she presented in her 1962 book, Silent Spring. 2014-02-28 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sir Graham Collingwood Liggins (1926-2010) Kathleen O'Connor Sir Graham Collingwood Liggins devoted much of his professional life to obstetric research. Liggins demonstrated that hormones created by the fetus helped initiate labor, rather than hormones originating solely from the mother. Liggins also discovered that cortisol given to pregnant mothers helped delay premature labor, and that it increased the likelihood that premature infants would breathe normally after birth. Prior to cortisol treatment, premature infants often died of respiratory distress syndrome characterized by the inability to inflate immature lungs. 2012-02-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Rudolf Carl Virchow (1821-1902) Megan Kearl Rudolf Carl Virchow lived in nineteenth century Prussia, now Germany, and proposed that omnis cellula e cellula, which translates to each cell comes from another cell, and which became and fundamental concept for cell theory. He helped found two fields, cellular pathology and comparative pathology, and he contributed to many others. Ultimately Virchow argued that disease is caused by changes in normal cells, also known as cellular pathology. 2012-03-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. Sturtevant Collecting Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920s 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stanley Alan Plotkin (1932– ) Christian H. Ross Stanley Alan Plotkin developed vaccines in the United States during the mid to late twentieth century. Plotkin began his research career at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied the rubella virus. In pregnant women, the rubella virus caused congenital rubella syndrome in the fetus, which led to various malformations and birth defects. Using WI-38 cells, a line of cells that originated from tissues of aborted fetuses, Plotkin successfully created RA27/3, a weakened strain of the rubella virus, which he then used to develop a rubella vaccine. 2017-04-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner collecting in the marsh Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
David Starr Jordan (1851-1931) Jill Briggs David Starr Jordan studied fish and promoted eugenics in the US during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In his work, he embraced Charles Darwin s theory of evolution and described the importance of embryology in tracing phylogenic relationships. In 1891, he became the president of Stanford University in Stanford, California. Jordan condemned war and promoted conservationist causes for the California wilderness, and he advocated for the eugenic sterilization of thousands of Americans. 2013-06-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Samuel W. Geiser 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) Nicole Erjavic Andreas Vesalius, also called Andries van Wesel, studied anatomy during the sixteenth century in Europe. Throughout his career, Vesalius thoroughly dissected numerous human cadavers, and took detailed notes and drawings of his research. Compiling his research, Vesalius published an anatomy work titled De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (On the fabric of the human body in seven books). The Fabrica included illustrations of dissected men, women, and uteruses with intact fetuses. 2018-01-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edward Stuart Russell (1887-1954) Mark A. Ulett Edward Stuart Russell was born 23 March 1887 to Helen Cockburn Young and the Reverend John N. Russell in Port Glasgow, Scotland. Friends and co-workers alike knew Russell as a quiet and focused, though always kind and helpful person. Trained in classics and biology, Russell's interests drew him to the study of historical and philosophical issues in the biological sciences, particularly morphology and animal behavior. According to Nils Roll-Hansen, Russell was one of the most influential philosophers of biology in the second third of the twentieth century. 2010-06-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles B. Atwell 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lydia Estes Pinkham (1819–1883) Rainey Horwitz Lydia Estes Pinkham invented and sold Lydia Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound, a medicinal tonic used to treat menstrual discomfort and promote female reproductive health in general, in the US during the nineteenth century. Pinkham also founded Mrs. Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Company, a business that sold natural remedies for women’s health issues. Throughout her life, Pinkham acted as an authority on female wellness, writing medical pamphlets about female anatomy and reproductive processes. 2017-05-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Katsuma Dan on his first meeting with Victor Heilbrunn Katsuma Dan Katsuma Dan reflects on his first meeting with Dr. Victor Heilbrunn at the University of Pennsylvania in December 1930. Recorded at the University of Washington, Friday Harbor group in 1978. 1978 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Robert Cantor (1942- ) Alexis Abboud Charles Robert Cantor helped sequence the human genome, and he developed methods to non-invasively determine the genes in human fetuses. Cantor worked in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His early research focused on oligonucleotides, small molecules of DNA or RNA. That research enabled the development of a technique that Cantor subsequently used to describe nucleotide sequences of DNA, a process called sequencing, in humans. Cantor was the principal scientist for the Human Genome Project, for which scientists sequenced the entirety of the human genome in 2003. 2015-06-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nettie Maria Stevens (1861-1912) Kaitlin Smith Multiple theories about what determines sex were tested at the turn of the twentieth century. By experimenting on germ cells, cytologist Nettie Maria Stevens collected evidence to support the connection between heredity and the sex of offspring. Stevens was able to interpret her data to conclude that chromosomes have a role in sex determination during development. For her time, she was an emerging breed: a woman of science making the leap from the world of data collection to that of male-dominated interpretive work. 2010-06-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ernest Everett Just (1883-1941) Karen Wellner Ernest Everett Just was an early twentieth century American experimental embryologist involved in research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and the Stazione Zoologica in Naples, Italy. Just was known for simple but elegant experiments that supported the "fertilizing" theory of Frank R. Lillie and served as an antagonist to Jacques Loeb's work with artificial parthenogenesis. 2010-06-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Philip Fischelis 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
George Nicholas Papanicolaou (1883–1962) Patsy Ciardullo George Nicholas Papanicolaou developed the Pap test in the United States during the twentieth century. The Pap test is a diagnostic procedure used to test for cervical cancer in women. Papanicolaou’s work helped improve the reproductive health of women by providing an effective means of identifying precancerous cells and improving the likelihood of early treatment and survival of cervical cancer. 2017-04-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Columbia Gang Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William Stewart Halsted (1852-1922) Carolina Abboud William Stewart Halsted was a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, during the late 1800s and early 1900s. In 1894 Halsted described his procedure for treating breast cancer by removing the breast tissue, chest muscles, and lymph nodes in the armpit, a procedure he named radical mastectomy, and that became the standard of care for treating breast cancer until 1970. 2017-07-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799) Mary E. Sunderland Lazzaro Spallanzani's imaginative application of experimental methods, mastery of microscopy, and wide interests led him to significant contributions in natural history, experimental biology, and physiology. His detailed and thoughtful observations illuminated a broad spectrum of problems ranging from regeneration to the genesis of thunderclouds. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
David Edwin Wildt (1950- ) Caroline Appleton David Edwin Wildt developed and applied assisted reproductive technologies to conserve rare and endangered wildlife species in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He advocated genome resource banks to help preserve biodiversity, and he advocated for practical ethics to guide wildlife reproductive biologists when they use technology and environmental planning. Wildt often focused on the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), but he researched greater than fifty vertebrate species. 2014-07-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Knowlton (1800–1850) Caroline Meek Charles Knowlton was a physician and author who advocated for increased access to information about reproduction in the nineteenth century in the US. Throughout his early medical education, Knowlton was particularly interested in anatomy and on several instances robbed graves for bodies to dissect. In 1832, Knowlton authored The Fruits of Philosophy, a pamphlet that contained detailed descriptions of the reproductive organs and information on conception and methods to control reproduction. 2017-10-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (1834-1919) Karen Wellner Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel was a prominent comparative anatomist and active lecturer in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He is most well known for his descriptions of phylogenetic trees, studies of radiolarians, and illustrations of vertebrate embryos to support his biogenetic law and Darwin's work with evolution. Haeckel aggressively argued that the development of an embryo repeats or recapitulates the progressive stages of lower life forms and that by studying embryonic development one could thus study the evolutionary history of life on earth. 2010-06-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Benjamin C. Gruenberg 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Karl Oskar Illmensee (1939–) Cheryl Lancaster Karl Oskar Illmensee studied the cloning and reproduction of fruit flies, mice, and humans in the US and Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Illmensee used nuclear transfer techniques (cloning) to create early mouse embryos from adult mouse cells, a technique biologists used in later decades to help explain how embryonic cells function during development. In the early 1980s, Illmensee faced accusations of fraud when others were unable to replicate the results of his experiments with cloned mouse embryos. 2017-02-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) Federica Turriziani Colonna Barbara McClintock worked on genetics in corn (maize) plants and spent most of her life conducting research at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Laurel Hollow, New York. McClintock's research focused on reproduction and mutations in maize, and described the phenomenon of genetic crossover in chromosomes. Through her maize mutation experiments, McClintock observed transposons, or mobile elements of genes within the chromosome, which jump around the genome. McClintock received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her research on chromosome transposition. 2014-07-05 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Bernard Nathanson (1926-2011) Mark Zhang Bernard Nathanson was an obstetrician and gynecologist in New York City, New York, who argued for, and later against, women's rights to abortion. Between 1970 and 1979, Nathanson oversaw at least 75,000 abortions, 5,000 of which he performed himself, earning him the nickname of abortion king. However, his views regarding abortion shifted in 1973, after he watched an abortion using ultrasound imaging technology. Afterwards, Nathanson began to oppose women's rights to abortion, and he published the anti-abortion book Aborting America and produced the film Silent Scream. 2013-04-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
St. Augustine (354-430) Katherine Brind'Amour St. Augustine of Hippo, born Aurelius Augustinus to a respectable family in the year 354 CE, is now considered one of the foremost theologians in the history of the Catholic Church. His writings, including his philosophy regarding life in the womb and the moral worth of embryos, influenced many other great thinkers of his time and throughout history. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Knight and Robert Chambers 1931 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Truman William Brophy (1848–1928) Jillian Renee Kersten Truman William Brophy developed a cleft palate surgical repair, later called the Brophy Operation, in the late nineteenth century US. The procedure improved facial aesthetics and speech in cleft palate patients. A cleft palate occurs during development when the palatal bones in the roof of the mouth don't completely fuse, leaving an opening, or cleft, in the upper lip and mouth. Brophy's cleft repair used compression inside and outside of the mouth to push the palatal bones into normal alignment shortly after birth. 2017-02-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. and Mrs. E. P. Lyo 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Bertrand Gurdon (1933- ) Inbar Maayan, Sean Cohmer Sir John Bertrand Gurdon further developed nuclear transplantation, the technique used to clone organisms and to create stem cells, while working in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Gurdon's research built on the work of Thomas King and Robert Briggs in the United States, who in 1952 published findings that indicated that scientists could take a nucleus from an early embryonic cell and successfully transfer it into an unfertilized and enucleated egg cell. 2012-10-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Anthony Comstock (1844–1915) Lakshmeeramya Malladi Anthony Comstock was a US postal inspector and politician who advocated for the suppression of obscenity and vice throughout the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. Comstock considered any sexually explicit material like pornography and literature related to birth control and abortion as obscene. In 1873, Comstock lobbied US Congress to pass an anti-obscenity law titled An Act for the Suppression of Trade in, and Circulation of, Obscene Literature and Articles of Immoral Use, also called the Comstock Act. 2017-05-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ian Wilmut (1944- ) Inbar Maayan British embryologist Sir Ian Wilmut, best known for his work in the field of animal genetic engineering and the successful cloning of sheep, was born 7 July 1944 in Hampton Lucy, England. The family later moved to Scarborough, in the north of the country, to allow his father to accept a teaching position. There Wilmut met Gordon Whalley, head of the biology department at Scarborough High School for Boys, which Wilmut attended. 2010-11-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. P. K. Agersborg 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Gordon Watkins Douglas (1921-2000) Alexis Abboud Gordon Watkins Douglas researched cervical cancer, breach delivery, and treatment of high blood pressure during pregnancy in the US during the twentieth century. He worked primarily at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, New York. While at Bellevue, he worked with William E. Studdiford to develop treatments for women who contracted infections as a result of illegal abortions performed throughout the US in unsterile environments. 2014-09-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nicole Marthe Le Douarin (1930- ) Brad Jacobson Nicole Marthe Le Douarin was one of the first progressive female pioneers of developmental and embryological research. Some of her most notable and ground-breaking work involves grafting quail and chicken embryos together in order to study the developmental fate of each contributing embryo. Le Douarin was born in Brittany, France, on 20 August 1930. As an only child she was inspired by her mother, a school teacher at the time, to develop a passion for learning. 2010-11-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Gustav Jacob Born (1851-1900) Karen Wellner Gustav Jacob Born was an experimental embryologist whose original work with amphibians served as the platform for his wax-plate method of embryo modeling, heteroblastic (different tissues) and xenoplastic (similar species) transplantation methods, environmental influences on sex ratio studies, and proposed function of the corpus luteum. He was born 22 April 1851 in Kempen, Prussia, but his family moved to the larger city of Görlitz within a year after Born's birth. His father was Marcus Born, a physician and public health officer who practiced in the town of Görlitz. 2009-07-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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