People

Titlesort descending By Description Created Last modified
Albert E. Navez 1931 or 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Albert Francis Blakeslee 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Albert M. Reese 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Albert Prescott Mathews 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Albert William Liley (1929-1983) Kathleen O'Connor Albert William Liley advanced the science of fetal physiology and the techniques of life-saving in utero blood transfusions for fetuses with Rh incompatibility, also known as hemolytic disease. Due to his advances, fetuses too young to survive premature delivery, and likely to die in utero if their Rh incompabilities were left untreated, were successfully transfused and carried to term. Liley was as passionate as a clinician and researcher as he was about his views on the rights of the unborn. 2011-05-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777) Cera R. Lawrence Victor Albrecht von Haller was an 18th century scientist who did extensive work in the life sciences, including anatomy and physiology, botany, and developmental biology. His embryological work consisted of experiments in understanding the process of generation, and led him to adopt the model of preformationism called ovism (the idea that the new individual exists within the maternal egg prior to conception). Haller was born in Bern, Switzerland, on 16 October, 1708. His mother was Anna Maria Engel, and his father was Niklaus Emanuel Haller. 2008-09-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Albro D. Morrell 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alec John Jeffreys (1950–) Corey Harbison Alec John Jeffreys created a process called DNA fingerprinting in the UK during the twentieth century. For DNA fingerprinting, technicians identify a person as the source of a biological sample by comparing the genetic information contained in the person's DNA to the DNA contained in the sample. Jeffreys developed the technique in the 1980s while at the University of Leicester in Leicester, UK. Jeffreys's technique had immediate applications. In forensic science, DNA fingerprinting enabled police to identify suspects of crimes based on their genetic identities. 2017-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado (1964- ) Mary E. Sunderland Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado is a Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Utah School of Medicine and is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Born in Caracas, Venezuela, 24 February 1964, Sánchez Alvarado left his home to pursue education in the United States, where he received a Bachelor of Science in molecular biology and chemistry from Vanderbilt University in 1986 and a Doctorate in pharmacology and cell biophysics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in 1992. 2010-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alexander Hollaender 1933 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alexander Sandow 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alexander Weinstein undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) Adam R. Navis Alexis Carrel was a doctor and researcher who studied tissue cultures. He continued Ross Granville Harrison's research and produced many improvements in the field of tissue culture and surgery. He was the recipient of the 1912 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his development of surgical techniques to repair blood vessels. Carrel was born on 28 June 1873 in Sainte-Foy-les-Lyon, France, to Anne-Marie Ricard and Alexis Carrel Billiard. His father died when he was five years old. 2008-02-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alfred C. Redfield 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alfred Day Hershey (1908–1997) Victoria Hernandez During the twentieth century in the United States, Alfred Day Hershey studied phages, or viruses that infect bacteria, and experimentally verified that genes were made of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. Genes are molecular, heritable instructions for how an organism develops. When Hershey started to study phages, scientists did not know if phages contained genes, or whether genes were made of DNA or protein. In 1952, Hershey and his research assistant, Martha Chase, conducted phage experiments that convinced scientists that genes were made of DNA. 2019-04-29 30 Apr 2019 - 10:18:40am
Alfred F. Huettner 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alfred Henry Sturtevant 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alfred Henry Sturtevant (1891–1970) Kevin Gleason Alfred Henry Sturtevant studied heredity in fruit flies in the US throughout the twentieth century. From 1910 to 1928, Sturtevant worked in Thomas Hunt Morgan’s research lab in New York City, New York. Sturtevant, Morgan, and other researchers established that chromosomes play a role in the inheritance of traits. In 1913, as an undergraduate, Sturtevant created one of the earliest genetic maps of a fruit fly chromosome, which showed the relative positions of genes along the chromosome. 2017-05-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alfred M. Lucas 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alfred Sherwood Romer 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alice Brown 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Allan Charles Wilson (1934-1991) Dorothy Haskett Allan C. Wilson studied genes, proteins, and body structures of animals and humans in the US during the second half of the twentieth century. Wilson also studied human evolution. Although morphology and behaviors of humans (Homo sapiens) and great apes differ, Wilson found that they have biochemical and genetic similarities. Wilson and his colleagues calculated the time period of humans' and African apes' common ancestor. 2014-07-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alpheus Hyatt Plaque After 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Alphonse M. Schiwitalla 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Ancel Keys 1930 or 1931 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) Nicole Erjavic Andreas Vesalius, also called Andries van Wesel, studied anatomy during the sixteenth century in Europe. Throughout his career, Vesalius thoroughly dissected numerous human cadavers, and took detailed notes and drawings of his research. Compiling his research, Vesalius published an anatomy work titled De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (On the fabric of the human body in seven books). The Fabrica included illustrations of dissected men, women, and uteruses with intact fetuses. 2018-01-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Andrew Francis Dixon (1868-1936) S. Alexandra Aston Andrew Francis Dixon studied human anatomy and egg cells at the turn of the twentieth century in Ireland and Great Britain. Dixon studied the sensory and motor nervous system of the face, the cancellous bone tissue of the femur, supernumerary kidneys, and the urogenital system. In 1927 Dixon described a mature human ovarian follicle. This follicle, Dixon noted, contained an immature human egg cell (oocyte) with a visible first polar body and the beginnings of the second polar body. 2014-04-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Andrew Zachary Fire (1959- ) Catherine May Andrew Zachary Fire is a professor at Stanford University and Nobel Laureate. Fire worked at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Embryology in Baltimore, Maryland, with colleague Craig Mello, where they discovered that RNA molecules could be used to turn off or knock out the expression of genes. Fire and Mello called the process RNA interference (RNAi), and won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2006 for their discovery. 2011-11-28 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ann Dubuy (Mrs. H. G. Dubuy) undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Ann Haven Morgan 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Ann Trow (Madame Restell) (1812–1878) Rainey Horwitz Self-proclaimed female physician Ann Trow was a women’s reproductive health specialist as well as an abortion provider in New York City, New York during the mid 1800s. Though she had no formal medical training or background, Trow provided women with healthcare and abortions under the alias Madame Restell. Restell gained attention across the United States for her career as a professional abortionist during a time when abortions were highly regulated and punishable with imprisonment. Restell was tried numerous times for carrying out abortions. 2017-08-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Anna Keltch 1927 or later 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Anna R. Whiting 1949 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Anna R. Whiting 1928 or later 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren (1927-2007) Aroob Khokhar Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren was a developmental biologist known for her work with embryology in the twentieth century. McLaren was the first researcher to grow mouse embryos outside of the womb. She experimented by culturing mouse eggs and successfully developing them into embryos, leading to advancements with in vitro fertilization. 2010-06-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Annie Dodge Wauneka (1910-1997) Lakshmeeramya Malladi Annie Dodge Wauneka, a member of the Navajo Tribal Council in Window Rock, Arizona, from 1951 to 1978, advocated for improved lifestyle, disease prevention, and access to medical knowledge in the Navajo Indian Reservation, later renamed the Navajo Nation. Wauneka served as chair of the Health and Welfare Committee of the Navajo Tribal Council and as a member of the US Surgeon General’s Advisory Committee on Indian Health. Wauneka advocated for initiatives aimed at promoting education, preventing tuberculosis, and reducing the infant mortality rate. 2017-12-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Annie Wood Besant (1847–1933) Caroline Meek, Claudia Nunez-Eddy Annie Wood Besant was a social activist who advocated for women’s access to birth control as well as marriage reform, labor reform, and Indian Nationalism in the nineteenth century in England and India. In her early career, Besant was involved in various social and political advocacy organizations including the National Secular Society, the Malthusian League, and the Fabian Society. Besant gave many public lectures and authored various articles in support of secularism, workers’ rights and unionization, and women’s rights. 2017-12-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Anselm Maynard Keefe 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Anthony Comstock (1844–1915) Lakshmeeramya Malladi Anthony Comstock was a US postal inspector and politician who advocated for the suppression of obscenity and vice throughout the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. Comstock considered any sexually explicit material like pornography and literature related to birth control and abortion as obscene. In 1873, Comstock lobbied US Congress to pass an anti-obscenity law titled An Act for the Suppression of Trade in, and Circulation of, Obscene Literature and Articles of Immoral Use, also called the Comstock Act. 2017-05-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Antoni Juljan Bant 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) Kristin Bolfert Antoni van Leeuwenhoek was born in Delft, the Netherlands, on 24 October 1632 to Margriet Jacobsdochter van den Berch and Philips Thooniszoon, both of whom were middle-class artisans. He attended grammar school in Warmond, and then temporarily moved to Benthuizen to live with relatives. Eventually Leeuwenhoek left for Amsterdam to work as a cloth merchant's apprentice. Returning to Delft, he married Barbara de Mey on 29 July 1654, and worked as a shopkeeper. The marriage resulted in five children, only one of whom, Maria, outlived Leeuwenhoek. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Arch E. Cole 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Arda Alden Green 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Aristotle (384-322 BCE) Dorothy Regan Haskett, Valerie Racine, Joanna Yang Aristotle studied developing organisms, among other things, in ancient Greece, and his writings shaped Western philosophy and natural science for greater than two thousand years. He spent much of his life in Greece and studied with Plato at Plato's Academy in Athens, where he later established his own school called the Lyceum. Aristotle wrote greater than 150 treatises on subjects ranging from aesthetics, politics, ethics, and natural philosophy, which include physics and biology. Less than fifty of Aristotle's treatises persisted into the twenty-first century. 2016-07-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:58am
Arne Tisellus undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Arthur D. Whedon 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Arthur Earl Walker (1907-1995) Alexandra Bohnenberger Arthur Earl Walker was a medical researcher and physician who studied the brain and neurosurgery in the United States during the twentieth century. Walker examined the connections of the thalamus to the rest of the brain and how the thalamus coordinates sensory signals. The thalamus is a cluster of nerve cells located between the two hemispheres of the brain and it is responsible for consciousness and sensory interpretation. 2017-03-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Arthur G. Mulder 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Arthur K. Parpart 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Arthur William Galston (1920–2008) Cecilia Chou Arthur W. Galston studied plant hormones in the United States during the late-twentieth century. His dissertation on the flowering process of soybean plants led others to develop Agent Orange, the most widely employed herbicide during the Vietnam War, used to defoliate forests and eliminate enemy cover and food sources. Galston protested the spraying of those defoliants in Vietnam, as they could be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment. 2017-04-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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