People

Title By Description Created Last modifiedsort descending
Roy Chapman Andrews (1884-1960) Paige Madison Roy Chapman Andrews traveled the world studying fossils, from mammals to dinosaurs, during the first half of the twentieth century. Andrews worked and collected fossil specimens for the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City, New York. Throughout his career, Andrews collected bones of many animal species, including a previously unknown species of a horned, herbivorous dinosaur, later named Proceratops andrewsi in his honor. Andrews published widely read narratives about his travels and field experiences, such as On the Trail of Ancient Man and Across Mongolian Plains. 2015-01-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. Sturtevant Collecting Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920s 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William Withey Gull (1816-1890) Alexis Abboud William Withey Gull studied paraplegia, anorexia, and hormones as a physician in England during the nineteenth century. In addition to caring for patients, he described the role of the posterior column of the spinal cord in paraplegia, and he was among the first to describe the conditions of anorexia and of hypochondria. He also researched the effects of thyroid hormone deficiencies in women who had malfunctioning thyroid glands. 2017-05-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Julia Bell (1879-1979) Jesse King Julia Bell worked in twentieth-century Britain, discovered Fragile X Syndrome, and helped find heritable elements of other developmental and genetic disorders. Bell also wrote much of the five volume Treasury of Human Inheritance, a collection about genetics and genetic disorders. Bell researched until late in life, authoring an original research article on the effects of the rubella virus of fetal development (Congenital Rubella Syndrome) at the age of 80. 2012-12-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner collecting in the marsh Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Florence Rena Sabin (1871-1953) Kimberly A. Buettner Florence Rena Sabin had successful careers as both a researcher and public health reformer. When Johns Hopkins University Medical School opened, accepting women and men on the same basis, Sabin was one of the first to enter. After the successful completion of her MD degree, Sabin went on to become the first female faculty member and later full-time professor at Johns Hopkins. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Emma Goldman (1869–1940) Rainey Horwitz Emma Goldman was a traveling public speaker and writer known for her anarchist political views as well as her opinions on contraception and birth limiting in the late nineteenth century in the United States. Goldman identified as an anarchist, which she explained as being part of an ideology in which people use violence to provoke or demand social and political change. Goldman was involved in many anarchist social groups and published the anarchist magazine Mother Earth. 2018-01-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Elinor Catherine Hamlin (1924- ) Patsy Ciardullo Elinor Catherine Hamlin founded and helped fund centers in Ethiopia to treat women affected by fistulas from obstetric complications. Obstetric fistulas develop in women who experience prolonged labor, as the pressure placed on the pelvis by the fetus during labor causes a hole, or fistula, to form between the vagina and the bladder (vesicovaginal fistula) or between the vagina and the rectum (rectovaginal fistula). Both of those conditions result in urinary or fecal incontinence, which often impacts womenÍs social status within their communities. 2015-03-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz and Sally Hughes Schrader Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1919 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Alec John Jeffreys (1950–) Corey Harbison Alec John Jeffreys created a process called DNA fingerprinting in the UK during the twentieth century. For DNA fingerprinting, technicians identify a person as the source of a biological sample by comparing the genetic information contained in the person's DNA to the DNA contained in the sample. Jeffreys developed the technique in the 1980s while at the University of Leicester in Leicester, UK. Jeffreys's technique had immediate applications. In forensic science, DNA fingerprinting enabled police to identify suspects of crimes based on their genetic identities. 2017-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Christian Heinrich Pander (1794-1865) Stephen C. Ruffenach Christian Heinrich Pander, often remembered as the father of embryology, also explored the fields of osteology, zoology, geology, and anatomy. He was born in Riga, Latvia, on 24 July 1794. Pander, with an eclectic history of research, is best remembered for his discovery and explanation of the structure of the chick blastoderm, a term he coined. In doing so, Pander was able to achieve the goal set forth by his teacher, Ignaz Döllinger, to reinvigorate the study of the chick embryo as a means of further exploring the science of embryology as a whole. 2009-07-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Girolamo Fabrici (1537-1619) Hilary Gilson Girolamo Fabrici, known as Hieronymus Fabricius in Latin, was given the surname Aquapendente from the city where he was born, near Orvieto, Italy. Born in 1533, Fabrici was the eldest son of a respected noble family, whose coat of arms appears as an illustration in the title page of Fabrici's book on embryology, De formato foetu. Little is known of Fabrici's parents. His father is recorded as Fabricio, and Fabrici is said to have been named for his paternal grandfather. 2008-08-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy Federica Turriziani Colonna The Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn (Anton Dohrn Zoological Station) is a public research institute focusing on biology and biodiversity. Hereafter called the Station, it was founded in Naples, Italy, in 1872 by Anton Dohrn. The type of research conducted at the Station has varied since it was created, though initial research focused on embryology. At the turn of the twentieth century, researchers at the Station established the sea urchin (Echinoidea) as a model organism for embryological research. 2014-12-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Philip Fischelis 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Camillo Golgi (1843–1926) Isra Mishqat Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells. Called the black reaction, Golgi’s staining technique enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision. Golgi also used the black reaction to identify structures within animal cells like the internal reticular apparatus that stores, packs, and modifies proteins, later named the Golgi apparatus in his honor. 2017-02-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866-1945) Mary E. Sunderland Although best known for his work with the fruit fly, for which he earned a Nobel Prize and the title "The Father of Genetics," Thomas Hunt Morgan's contributions to biology reach far beyond genetics. His research explored questions in embryology, regeneration, evolution, and heredity, using a variety of approaches. 2007-09-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Columbia Gang Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) Hilary Gilson Leonardo da Vinci was born on 15 April 1452, the illegitimate son of a young peasant girl by the name of Caterina and Ser Piero da Vinci, a well-renowned Florentine notary. Leonardo lived in Italy in the town of Vinci until his late teens and received a simple education in reading and writing as well as some training in mathematics and engineering. Although he was socially excluded by birthright from almost every profession and prohibited from attending any formal university, Leonardo went on to become a celebrated scientist, artist, and engineer. 2008-08-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Samuel W. Geiser 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ephraim McDowell (1771-1830) Alexis Darby Ephraim McDowell was an US abdominal surgeon who in 1809 performed one of the first successful ovarian surgeries. McDowell conducted his medical practice in Danville, Kentucky, where he used novel methods of ovariotomy to remove a twenty-two and a half pound ovarian tumor from his patient, Jane Crawford. At the time, surgeons performed ovariotomies by making an incision into each patient’s ovary to remove a mass. However, their patients often died from infection or blood loss. 2017-12-12 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francois Jacob (1920-2013) Valerie Racine Francois Jacob studied in bacteria and bacteriophages at the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France, in the second half of the twentieth century. In 1965, Jacob won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Andre M. Lwoff and Jacques L. Monod for their work on the genetic control of enzyme synthesis. Jacob studied how genes control and regulate metabolic enzymes in the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) and in lysogenic bacterial systems. He contributed to theories of transcriptional gene 2014-09-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles B. Atwell 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary-Claire King (1946– ) Meilin Zhu Mary-Claire King studied genetics in the US in the twenty-first century. King identified two genes associated with the occurrence of breast cancer, breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2). King showed that mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes cause two types of reproductive cancer, breast and ovarian cancer. Because of King’s discovery, doctors can screen women for the inheritance of mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to evaluate their risks for breast and ovarian cancer. 2017-08-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Victor Ambros (1953-) Catherine May, Justin M. Wolter Victor Ambros is a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and he discovered the first microRNA (miRNA) in 1993. Ambros researched the genetic control of developmental timing in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and he helped describe gene function and regulation during the worm’s development and embryogenesis. His discovery of miRNA marked the beginning of research into a form of genetic regulation found throughout diverse life forms from plants to humans. Ambros is a central figure in the miRNA and C. 2012-05-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Katsuma Dan on his first meeting with Victor Heilbrunn Katsuma Dan Katsuma Dan reflects on his first meeting with Dr. Victor Heilbrunn at the University of Pennsylvania in December 1930. Recorded at the University of Washington, Friday Harbor group in 1978. 1978 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Knight and Robert Chambers 1931 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1805-1861) Jesse Potestas Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire studied anatomy and congenital abnormalities in humans and other animals in nineteenth century France. Under the tutelage of his father, Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Isidore compiled and built on his father's studies of individuals with developmental malformations, then called monstrosities. 2017-02-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Hans Spemann (1869-1941) Karen Wellner Hans Spemann was an experimental embryologist best known for his transplantation studies and as the originator of the "organizer" concept. One of his earliest experiments involved constricting the blastomeres of a fertilized salamander egg with a noose of fine baby hair, resulting in a partially double embryo with two heads and one tail. 2010-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. and Mrs. E. P. Lyo 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Beatrice Mintz (1921- ) Adam R. Navis Beatrice Mintz is a brilliant researcher who has developed techniques essential for many aspects of research on mouse development. She produced the first successful mouse chimeras and meticulously characterized their traits. She has worked with various cancers and produced viable mice from the cells of a teratoma. Mintz participated in the development of transgenic mice by the incorporation of foreign DNA into a mouse genome. 2009-01-21 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Father Frank Pavone (1959- ) Katherine Brind'Amour Father Frank Pavone, a key proponent of the Roman Catholic Church's pro-life movement, has devoted his life's work to ending abortion, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell research, and other techniques and procedures that he believes threaten human life from conception to death. His contributions to the pro-life movement include founding a new religious order called the Missionaries of the Gospel of Life and participating in high-profile protests and television interviews for the pro-life cause. 2008-02-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
August Karl Gustav Bier (1861–1949) Nicole Erjavic In the late nineteenth century, August Karl Gustav Bier was a surgeon in Germany who studied spinal cord anesthesia, later called spinal block. Bier found that, depending upon the amount of anesthesia introduced into the spinal cord, a large area of the human body could be numbed to various degrees. Bier established a procedure to numb individuals from the lower legs to the upper abdomen, with the individual’s numbness ranging from them feeling pressure on their body to them feeling nothing at all. 2017-11-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis Sellers Collins (1950- ) Tito Carvalho Francis Sellers Collins helped lead the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, which helped describe the DNA sequence of the human genome by 2001, and he helped develop technologies used in molecular genetics while working in the US in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He directed the US National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR), which became the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), located in Bethesda, Maryland, from 1993 to 2008. 2014-04-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Benjamin C. Gruenberg 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ann Trow (Madame Restell) (1812–1878) Rainey Horwitz Self-proclaimed female physician Ann Trow was a women’s reproductive health specialist as well as an abortion provider in New York City, New York during the mid 1800s. Though she had no formal medical training or background, Trow provided women with healthcare and abortions under the alias Madame Restell. Restell gained attention across the United States for her career as a professional abortionist during a time when abortions were highly regulated and punishable with imprisonment. Restell was tried numerous times for carrying out abortions. 2017-08-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Warren Harmon Lewis (1870-1964) Kimberly A. Buettner As one of the first to work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington Department of Embryology, Warren Harmon Lewis made a number of contributions to the field of embryology. In addition to his experimental discoveries on muscle development and the eye, Lewis also published and revised numerous works of scientific literature, including papers in the Carnegie Contributions to Embryology and five editions of Gray's Anatomy. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Robert Geoffrey Edwards (1925-2013) Samuel Philbrick Robert Geoffrey Edwards worked with Patrick Christopher Steptoe to develop in-vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques during the 1960s and 1970s in the United Kingdom. Louise Brown, the world' s first "test-tube baby," was born as a result of Edwards and Steptoe's IVF techniques in 1978, and since then more than four million children have been born using IVF techniques. Publicity and controversy accompanied Edwards and Steptoe's work as conservative religious institutions expressed concern over the morality of the IVF procedure. 2011-06-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Roy John Britten (1919-2012) Abhinav Mishra Roy John Britten studied DNA sequences in the US in the second half of the twentieth century, and he helped discover repetitive elements in DNA sequences. Additionally, Britten helped propose models and concepts of gene regulatory networks. Britten studied the organization of repetitive elements and, analyzing data from the Human Genome Project, he found that the repetitive elements in DNA segments do not code for proteins, enzymes, or cellular parts. Britten hypothesized that repetitive elements helped cause cells to 2014-10-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Annie Wood Besant (1847–1933) Caroline Meek, Claudia Nunez-Eddy Annie Wood Besant was a social activist who advocated for women’s access to birth control as well as marriage reform, labor reform, and Indian Nationalism in the nineteenth century in England and India. In her early career, Besant was involved in various social and political advocacy organizations including the National Secular Society, the Malthusian League, and the Fabian Society. Besant gave many public lectures and authored various articles in support of secularism, workers’ rights and unionization, and women’s rights. 2017-12-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Joseph King Jr. (1921-2000) Sean Cohmer Thomas Joseph King Jr. was a developmental biologist who, with fellow scientist Robert Briggs, pioneered a method of transplanting nuclei from blastula cells into fresh egg cells lacking nuclei. This method, dubbed nuclear transplantation, facilitated King's studies on cancer cell development. King's work was instrumental for the development of cloning of fish, insects, and mammals. 2012-01-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Albert William Liley (1929-1983) Kathleen O'Connor Albert William Liley advanced the science of fetal physiology and the techniques of life-saving in utero blood transfusions for fetuses with Rh incompatibility, also known as hemolytic disease. Due to his advances, fetuses too young to survive premature delivery, and likely to die in utero if their Rh incompabilities were left untreated, were successfully transfused and carried to term. Liley was as passionate as a clinician and researcher as he was about his views on the rights of the unborn. 2011-05-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sturtevant in uniform, view 2 Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1917 3 Jul 2018 - 9:40:59pm
Leonard Colebrook (1883–1967) Safiya Shaikh Leonard Colebrook was a physician who researched bacteria and infections in England during the twentieth century. In 1936, Colebrook deployed the antibiotic Prontosil to treat puerperal fever, a disorder that results from bacterial infections in the uterine tracts of women after childbirth or abortions. Colebrook also advanced care for burn patients by advocating for the creation of burn units in hospitals and by using antisepsis medication for burn wound infections. Colebrook’s work on treatments for puerperal fever reduced cases of puerperal fever throughout the world. 2017-05-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Georges Cuvier (1769-1832) Valerie Racine Georges Cuvier, baptized Georges Jean-Leopold Nicolas-Frederic Cuvier, was a professor of anatomy at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, through the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Scholars recognize Cuvier as a founder of modern comparative anatomy, and as an important contributor to vertebrate paleontology and geology. Cuvier studied the form and function of animal anatomy, writing four volumes on quadruped fossils and co-writing eleven volumes on the natural history of fish with Achille Valenciennes. 2013-07-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. P. K. Agersborg 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edward Drinker Cope (1840-1897) Karla T. Moeller Edward Drinker Cope studied fossils and anatomy in the US in the late nineteenth century. Based on his observations of skeletal morphology, Cope developed a novel mechanism to explain the law of parallelism, the idea that developing organisms successively pass through stages resembling their ancestors. Others had proposed the addition of new body forms at the end of an individual organism's developed as a mechanism through which new species arose, but those proposals relied on changes in the lengths of gestation or incubation. 2012-01-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Johannes Holtfreter (1901-1992) Adam R. Navis Johannes Holtfreter made important discoveries about the properties of the organizer discovered by Hans Spemann. Although he spent much time away from the lab over many years, he was a productive researcher. His colleagues noted that the time he spent away helped revitalize his ideas. He is credited with the development of a balanced salt medium to allow embryos to develop; the discovery that dead organizer tissue retains inductive abilities; and the development of specification, competence, and distribution of fate maps in the developing frog embryo. 2008-02-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Carl Richard Moore (1892-1955) Mary Drago Carl Richard Moore was a professor and researcher at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois who studied sex hormones in animals from 1916 until his death in 1955. Moore focused on the role of hormones on sex differentiation in offspring, the optimal conditions for sperm production, and the effects of vasectomy or testicular implants on male sex hormone production. Moore's experiments to create hermaphrodites in the laboratory contributed to the theory of a feedback loop between the pituitary and fetal gonadal hormones to control sex differentiation. 2014-02-18 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sturtevant and Huettner standing by their canoe Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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