People

Titlesort ascending By Description Created Last modified
O. C. Glasser 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Norman Haire (1892-1952) Claudia Nunez-Eddy Norman Haire was a physician who advocated for eugenics, which is the betterment of human population by promoting positive traits, and birth control rights in the twentieth century in both Australia and the UK. In the UK, Haire joined the Malthusian League, a contraception advocacy organization, and helped the League open the first physician-supervised birth control clinic, called Walworth Women’s Welfare Centre in London, England. 2017-04-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Norbert Freinkel (1926–1989) Blaise Castagnetti During the twentieth century, Norbert Freinkel studied hormones and diabetes in the US. Freinkel conducted many experiments that enabled him to determine the factors that influence hormones of the thyroid gland to bind to proteins and to determine the effects that those thyroid hormones have on surrounding tissues. Furthermore, Freinkel researched gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that occurs for the first time during a women’s pregnancy. That type of diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin, a hormone made in the body. 2018-01-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nobska Lighthouse Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nobska Beach Road Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1916 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Nina Kobelt 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Nikolai Ivanovic Vavilov (1887-1943) Marci Baranski Nikolai Ivanovich Vavilov proposed theories of plant genetic diversity and participated in the political debate about genetics in Soviet Russia in the early twentieth century. Vavilov collected plant species around the world, building one of the first and most comprehensive seed banks, and he spent much of his life researching plant breeding and genetics. Vavilov also developed a theory of the historical centers of origin of cultivated plants. Vavilov spent most of his scientific career in Russia, although he studied abroad and traveled extensively. 2014-04-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Night on the Elizabeth Islands during a collecting trip Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nicole Marthe Le Douarin (1930- ) Brad Jacobson Nicole Marthe Le Douarin was one of the first progressive female pioneers of developmental and embryological research. Some of her most notable and ground-breaking work involves grafting quail and chicken embryos together in order to study the developmental fate of each contributing embryo. Le Douarin was born in Brittany, France, on 20 August 1930. As an only child she was inspired by her mother, a school teacher at the time, to develop a passion for learning. 2010-11-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nicolaas Hartsoeker (1656-1725) Cera R. Lawrence Nicolaas Hartsoeker, a Dutch astronomer, optics manufacturer, and naturalist, was born 26 March 1656 in Gouda, Netherlands, and died 10 December 1725. His mother was Anna van der Mey and his father was Christiaan Hartsoeker, a prominent evangelical minister. His major contribution to embryology was his observations of human sperm cells, which he claimed to be the first to see under a microscope. His sketch of the homunculus, a tiny preformed human he believed to exist in the head of spermatazoa, is his lasting scientific legacy in the field of embryology. 2008-09-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nettie Maria Stevens (1861-1912) Kaitlin Smith Multiple theories about what determines sex were tested at the turn of the twentieth century. By experimenting on germ cells, cytologist Nettie Maria Stevens collected evidence to support the connection between heredity and the sex of offspring. Stevens was able to interpret her data to conclude that chromosomes have a role in sex determination during development. For her time, she was an emerging breed: a woman of science making the leap from the world of data collection to that of male-dominated interpretive work. 2010-06-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nathaniel E. Robinson 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Nancy Wilson at the microscope Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Nancy Goodman Brinker (1946– ) Dina A. Lienhard Nancy Goodman Brinker founded the largest breast cancer organization in the US, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, during the twentieth century. In 1982, Brinker created the organization, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, in memory of her sister, who had died of breast cancer two years earlier. During the early twentieth century, breast cancer was socially stigmatized, very few people discussed the disease, and there were limited treatment options available for those diagnosed with the disease. 2017-12-12 30 Nov 2018 - 5:03:29am
N. W. Rakestraw 1930s?-1949? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
N. Borodin 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
N. A. Cobb 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Myra M. Sampson 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Muriel Wheldale Onslow (1880-1932) Samantha Hauserman Muriel Wheldale Onslow studied flowers in England with genetic and biochemical techniques in the early twentieth century. Working with geneticist William Bateson, Onslow used Mendelian principles and biochemical analysis together to understand the inheritance of flower colors at the beginning of the twentieth century. Onslow's study of snapdragons, or Antirrhinum majus, resulted in her description of epistasis, a phenomenon in which the phenotypic effect of one gene is influenced by one or more other genes. She discovered several biochemicals related to color formation. 2013-10-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Muda 1927 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Warren H. Lewis 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. W. H. Farr 1927 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Quinn 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Margaret M. Hoskins 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Helen Daniels Young 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Eugenie Galtsoff 1925?-1939? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Edith L. Wile 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Anne Yates 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. and Dr. W .E. deMol undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Mrs. Alfred (Mary) Huettner on a boat to Martha's Vineyard Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mother Teresa (1910-1997) Katherine Brind'Amour Mother Teresa, a Roman Catholic nun known for her charitable work and attention to the poor, was born 26 August 1910. The youngest child of Albanian parents Nikola and Drane Bojaxhiu, she was christened Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu and spent her early life in the place of her birth, present-day Skopje, in the Republic of Macedonia. In addition to her unwavering devotion to serve the sick and the poor, Mother Teresa firmly defended traditional Catholic teachings on more controversial issues, such as contraception and abortion. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Moses Kunitz and N. West 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Morton M. McCutcheon 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mohamed Hasson Radi 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Minnie Joycelyn Elders (1933–) J. Nalubega Ross Minnie Joycelyn Elders, known as Joycelyn Elders, is a pediatrician and professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1953, Elders began to work with the US Army, where she trained as a physical therapist, being the only African American woman in her training class. Elders eventually became a medical doctor in 1956, specializing in pediatric endocrinology. In 1993, then US President Bill Clinton appointed Elders as the Surgeon General for the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, which she served as until 1994. 2021-01-15 15 Jan 2021 - 8:20:47pm
Min Chueh Chang (1908-1991) Kimberly A. Buettner As one of the researchers involved in the development of the oral contraceptive pill, Min Chueh Chang helped to revolutionize the birth control movement. Although best known for his involvement with "the pill," Chang also made a number of discoveries throughout his scientific career involving a range of topics within the field of reproductive biology. He published nearly 350 articles in scientific journals. 2007-11-08 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Milton J. Greenman 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Milan Vuitch (1915–1993) Victoria Higginbotham Milan Vuitch was an abortion provider in the twentieth century, who performed thousands of abortions in Washington, DC, at a time when abortions were legal only if they preserved the life or health of the pregnant woman. Vuitch was a frequent critic of Washington DC’s anti-abortion law and was arrested multiple times for providing abortions that were not considered necessary to preserve the pregnant woman’s life. After several arrests, Vuitch challenged the law under which he had been arrested, and his case made its way to the Supreme Court in Vuitch v. United States. 2018-06-09 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Michael D. West (1953- ) Lijing Jiang Michael D. West is a biomedical entrepreneur and investigator whose aim has been to extend human longevity with biomedical interventions. His focus has ranged from the development of telomerase-based therapeutics to the application of human embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine. Throughout his eventful career, West has pursued novel and sometimes provocative ideas in a fervent, self-publicizing manner. As of 2009, West advocated using human somatic cell nuclear transfer techniques to derive human embryonic stem cells for therapeutic practice. 2010-06-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Meyer Bodansky 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Melvin H. Knisley 1936 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
McKeen Cattell 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Maxton C. Kahn 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Max Ludwig Henning Delbruck (1906–1981) Victoria Hernandez Max Ludwig Henning Delbrick applied his knowledge of theoretical physics to biological systems such as bacterial viruses called bacteriophages, or phages, and gene replication during the twentieth century in Germany and the US. Delbrück demonstrated that bacteria undergo random genetic mutations to resist phage infections. Those findings linked bacterial genetics to the genetics of higher organisms. In the mid-twentieth century, Delbrück helped start the Phage Group and Phage Course in the US, which further organized phage research. 2017-09-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Maurice Ralph Hilleman (1919–2005) Christian H. Ross Maurice Ralph Hilleman developed vaccines at the Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research in West Point, Pennsylvania, during the twentieth century. Over the course of his career at Merck, Hilleman created over forty vaccines, making him one of the most prolific developers of vaccine in the twentieth century. Of the fourteen vaccines commonly given to children in the US by 2015, Hilleman was responsible for eight of them. Hilleman's most widely used vaccine was his measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. 2017-04-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Maurice N. Richter 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Maurice E. Krahl 1934 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Matthias Jacob Schleiden (1804–1881) Sara Parker Matthias Jacob Schleiden helped develop the cell theory in Germany during the nineteenth century. Schleiden studied cells as the common element among all plants and animals. Schleiden contributed to the field of embryology through his introduction of the Zeiss microscope lens and via his work with cells and cell theory as an organizing principle of biology. 2017-05-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Matthew Stanley Meselson (1930– ) Victoria Hernandez 2017-05-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Matthew Howard Kaufman (1942–2013) Lance Villarreal Matthew Kaufman was a professor of anatomy at the University of Edinburgh, in Edinburgh, UK, who specialized in mouse anatomy, development, and embryology during the late twentieth century. According to the The Herald, he was the first, alongside his colleague Martin Evans, to isolate and culture embryonic stem cells. Researchers initially called those cells Evans-Kaufman cells. In 1992, Kaufman published The Atlas of Mouse Development, a book that included photographs of mice development and mice organs over time. 2018-08-31 26 Jan 2019 - 2:56:33am

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