People

Titlesort ascending By Description Created Last modified
U. Yegri 1927 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
U. B. Stough 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Truman William Brophy (1848–1928) Jillian Renee Kersten Truman William Brophy developed a cleft palate surgical repair, later called the Brophy Operation, in the late nineteenth century US. The procedure improved facial aesthetics and speech in cleft palate patients. A cleft palate occurs during development when the palatal bones in the roof of the mouth don't completely fuse, leaving an opening, or cleft, in the upper lip and mouth. Brophy's cleft repair used compression inside and outside of the mouth to push the palatal bones into normal alignment shortly after birth. 2017-02-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Tracy Irwin Storer 1920s 21 Aug 2015 - 1:33:13am
Tracy E. Hazen 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Torsten Wiesel (1924– ) Dina A. Lienhard Torsten Nils Wiesel studied visual information processing and development in the US during the twentieth century. He performed multiple experiments on cats in which he sewed one of their eyes shut and monitored the response of the cat’s visual system after opening the sutured eye. For his work on visual processing, Wiesel received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1981 along with David Hubel and Roger Sperry. 2017-09-13 30 Nov 2018 - 5:00:22am
Thomas Raphael Verny (1936– ) Carrie Keller During the twentieth century, Thomas Raphael Verny studied the way that environment affects a developing fetus’s character and psychological development. Verny studied the concept of memory before birth and covered both the prenatal and perinatal periods, meaning the time the fetus is in the womb and the weeks immediately before or after birth, respectively. During those times, Verny claimed that patterns of maternal attitudes and experiences, such as affection and stress-related emotions, impact the development of the child. 2019-07-31 12 Aug 2019 - 10:43:14pm
Thomas Joseph King Jr. (1921-2000) Sean Cohmer Thomas Joseph King Jr. was a developmental biologist who, with fellow scientist Robert Briggs, pioneered a method of transplanting nuclei from blastula cells into fresh egg cells lacking nuclei. This method, dubbed nuclear transplantation, facilitated King's studies on cancer cell development. King's work was instrumental for the development of cloning of fish, insects, and mammals. 2012-01-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan, looking into camera, paper in hand Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Thomas Hunt Morgan, E.B. Wilson and others having a picnic Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan, children & friends at the Grand Central Station Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920-05-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866-1945) Mary E. Sunderland Although best known for his work with the fruit fly, for which he earned a Nobel Prize and the title "The Father of Genetics," Thomas Hunt Morgan's contributions to biology reach far beyond genetics. His research explored questions in embryology, regeneration, evolution, and heredity, using a variety of approaches. 2007-09-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Thomas Hunt Morgan Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895) Samantha Hauserman In nineteenth century Great Britain, Thomas Henry Huxley proposed connections between the development of organisms and their evolutionary histories, critiqued previously held concepts of homology, and promoted Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. Many called him Darwin's Bulldog. Huxley helped professionalize and redefine British science. He wrote about philosophy, religion, and social issues, and researched and theorized in many biological fields. 2013-11-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Grave 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Thesis: The Hwang Woo-Suk Scandal and the Development of Bioethics in South Korea Anne Clay In 2004, the South Korean geneticist Woo-Suk Hwang published what was widely regarded as the most important research finding in biotechnology that year. In the prestigious American journal Science, he claimed that he had succeeded in cloning a human blastocyst, which is an embryo in its early developmental stages (Hwang et al. 2004). A year later, in a second Science article, he made the earth-shattering announcement that he had derived eleven embryonic stem cell lines using his cloning technique (Hwang et al. 2005). The international scientific community was stunned. 2020-11-26 28 Nov 2020 - 1:04:37am
Thesis: Leo Kanner and the Psychobiology of Autism Sean Cohmer This thesis illustrates that Kanner held an explicitly descriptive frame of reference toward his eleven child patients, their parents, and autism. Adolf Meyer, his mentor at Johns Hopkins, trained him to make detailed life-charts under a clinical framework called psychobiology. By understanding that Kanner was a psychobiologist by training, I revisit the original definition of autism as a category of mental disorder and restate its terms. 2020-11-03 4 Nov 2020 - 12:25:11am
Thesis: Dismantling Legal Constraints to Contraception in the 1900s Lakshmeeramya Malladi In the late nineteenth century, the Comstock Act of 1873 made the distribution of contraception illegal and classified contraception as an obscenity. Reflecting the predominant attitude towards contraception at the time, the Comstock Act was the first federal anti-obscenity law that targeted contraception. However, social acceptance of birth control changed at the turn of the twentieth century. In this thesis, I analyzed legislation, advocates, and literature pertinent to that social change to report on the events leading up to the decriminalization of contraception. 2021-01-27 27 Jan 2021 - 7:59:31pm
Theophilus Shickel Painter (1889-1969) Dorothy Haskett Theophilus Shickel Painter studied the structure and function of chromosomes in the US during in the early to mid-twentieth century. Painter worked at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas. In the 1920s and 1930s, Painter studied the chromosomes of the salivary gland giant chromosomes of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), with Hermann J. Muller. Muller and Painter studied the ability of X-rays to cause changes in the chromosomes of fruit flies. Painter also studied chromosomes in mammals. 2014-11-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Theodosius Dobzhansky 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Theodora (Theo) Emily Colborn (1927-2014) Alexis Abboud Theodora Colborn studied how chemicals affect organisms as they develop and reproduce during the twentieth and twenty first centuries in the US. By the 1940s, researchers had reported that chemicals from agricultural and industrial processes affected how wild organisms developed, but in 1991, Colborn organized the Wingspread Conference in Racine, Wisconsin, at which a group of scientists classed these chemicals as environmentally harmful substances. Colborn and her colleagues called those chemicals endocrine disruptors, as they mimic or block the body's endocrine system. 2014-12-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Theodor Heinrich Boveri (1862-1915) Inbar Maayan Theodor Boveri investigated the mechanisms of heredity. He developed the chromosomal theory of inheritance and the idea of chromosomal individuality. Boveri sought to provide a comprehensive explanation for the hereditary role and behavior of chromosomes. He hoped that his experiments would also help to distinguish the roles of the nucleus and the cytoplasm in embryogenesis. Boveri was particularly interested in how offspring are shaped by the attributes of their parents. 2011-03-03 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass. 1935 B.R. Coonfield By the 1930s, the MBL had become "the" place to go during the summer for biological research and training. Luminaries such as Frank Lillie, Edmund Beecher Wilson, Edwin Grant Conklin, and Thomas Hunt Morgan took their students, packed up their families and research labs, and headed to the MBL. They worked in labs, ate together in the Mess, and they often lived in the limited on-campus housing. Life at the MBL was a life where fun, family, and science intertwined. This film, taken in 1935 by B. R. Coonfield of Brooklyn College, captures snippets of life at the MBL. 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Terao 1927 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Taku Komai 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T.Y. Chen 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T.H. Morgan in the "Fly Room" Columbia University c. 1916 Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1916 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T.H. Bissonette 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T. T. Chen 1931-1934 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T. S. Painter 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T. J. Schwab 1936 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T. C. Donaldson 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
T. Braarud 1930s?-1949? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Sven Horstadius 1936 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sturtevant in uniform, view 2 Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1917 3 Jul 2018 - 9:40:59pm
Sturtevant and Huettner standing by their canoe Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stuart Mudd 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) M. Elizabeth Barnes Stephen Jay Gould studied snail fossils and worked at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts during the latter half of the twentieth century. He contributed to philosophical, historical, and scientific ideas in paleontology, evolutionary theory, and developmental biology. Gould, with Niles Eldredge, proposed the theory of punctuated equilibrium, a view of evolution by which species undergo long periods of stasis followed by rapid changes over relatively short periods instead of continually accumulating slow changes over millions of years. 2014-02-18 17 Sep 2019 - 7:15:06pm
Stephen Haweis 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Stephen dՉrsay 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Stephen C. Booskey 1936 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy Federica Turriziani Colonna The Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn (Anton Dohrn Zoological Station) is a public research institute focusing on biology and biodiversity. Hereafter called the Station, it was founded in Naples, Italy, in 1872 by Anton Dohrn. The type of research conducted at the Station has varied since it was created, though initial research focused on embryology. At the turn of the twentieth century, researchers at the Station established the sea urchin (Echinoidea) as a model organism for embryological research. 2014-12-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stanley Paul Leibo (1937–2014) Risa Schnebly Stanley Paul Leibo studied the cryopreservation of embryos in the US in the twentieth century. Cryopreservation is a method of preserving biological material through freezing. Early in his career, Leibo collaborated with other scientists to study why cells were oftentimes injured during freezing. Later, Leibo and his team accomplished one of the first successful births using previously-frozen mammalian embryos. 2021-02-05 5 Feb 2021 - 8:36:07am

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