People

Titlesort descending By Description Created Last modified
Carl Hartman 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Carl O. Dunbar 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Carl Richard Moore (1892-1955) Mary Drago Carl Richard Moore was a professor and researcher at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois who studied sex hormones in animals from 1916 until his death in 1955. Moore focused on the role of hormones on sex differentiation in offspring, the optimal conditions for sperm production, and the effects of vasectomy or testicular implants on male sex hormone production. Moore's experiments to create hermaphrodites in the laboratory contributed to the theory of a feedback loop between the pituitary and fetal gonadal hormones to control sex differentiation. 2014-02-18 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Carleton Rea 1920s 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am
Carol Widney Greider (1961-) Zane Bartlett Carol Widney Greider studied telomeres and telomerase in the US at the turn of the twenty-first century. She worked primarily at the University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley, California. She received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009, along with Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak, for their research on telomeres and telomerase. Telomeres are repetitive sequences of 2015-01-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Caspar Friedrich Wolff (1734-1794) Stephen Ruffenach Caspar Friedrich Wolff is most famous for his 1759 doctoral dissertation, Theoria Generationis, in which he described embryonic development in both plants and animals as a process involving layers of cells, thereby refuting the accepted theory of preformation: the idea that organisms develop as a result of the unfolding of form that is somehow present from the outset, as in a homunculus. This work generated a great deal of controversy and discussion at the time of its publication but was an integral move in the reemergence and acceptance of the theory of epigenesis. 2009-07-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Caswell Grave 1927-1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Caswell Grave 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Caswell Grave 1926 21 Aug 2015 - 1:32:54am
Catherine DeAngelis (1940– ) Alexis Darby In the late-twentieth century in the United States, Catherine DeAngelis was a pediatric physician, researcher, and editor of multiple medical journals. During her time with the Journal of the American Medical Association, DeAngelis became the journal’s first female editor. At Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, she studied how physician-nurse interactions affected patient care, how immunizations and adolescent pregnancy affected children, and how medications affected men and women differently. 2017-12-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Chang and Eng Bunker (1811–1874) Mudhaffar Bahjat Chāng (Chang) and Ēn (Eng) Bunker were conjoined twins in the nineteenth century in the United States, the first pair of conjoined twins whose condition was well documented in medical records. A conjoined twins is a rare condition in which two infants are born physically connected to each other. In their youth, the brothers earned money by putting themselves on display as curiosities and giving lectures and demonstrations about their condition. The Bunker brothers toured around the world, including the United States, Europe, Canada, and France, and allowed physicians to examine them. 2018-01-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Atwood Kofoid 1920s 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am
Charles B. Atwell 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles B. Wilson 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Benedict Davenport 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Benedict Davenport (1866-1944) Cera R. Lawrence Charles Benedict Davenport was an early twentieth-century experimental zoologist. Davenport founded both the Station for Experimental Evolution and the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor in New York. Though he was a talented statistician and skilled scientist, Davenport's scientific achievements are eclipsed by his lasting legacy as the scientific leader of the eugenics movement in the US. 2011-05-12 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Bonnet (1720-1793) Cera R. Lawrence Charles Bonnet was a naturalist and philosopher in the mid eighteenth century. His most important contribution to embryology was the discovery of parthenogenesis in aphids, proving that asexual reproduction of offspring was possible. In his later life, he was an outspoken defender of the theory of generation now known as preformationism, which stated that offspring exist prior to conception preformed in the germ cell of one of their parents. 2009-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Bradlaugh (1833–1891) Caroline Meek Charles Bradlaugh was as a political and social activist in the seventeenth century in England. He held leadership positions in various organizations focused on social and political activism including the Reform League, the London Secular Society, the newspaper National Reformer, and the National Secular Society. Throughout his career, Bradlaugh advocated for better conditions for the working poor, and for the separation of government and religion. 2017-10-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Cook Little 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles E. Hadley 1927, 1931 or later 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles E. Packard 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles H. Taft Jr. 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Henry Gilbert 1920s 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am
Charles Knight and Robert Chambers 1931 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Knowlton (1800–1850) Caroline Meek Charles Knowlton was a physician and author who advocated for increased access to information about reproduction in the nineteenth century in the US. Throughout his early medical education, Knowlton was particularly interested in anatomy and on several instances robbed graves for bodies to dissect. In 1832, Knowlton authored The Fruits of Philosophy, a pamphlet that contained detailed descriptions of the reproductive organs and information on conception and methods to control reproduction. 2017-10-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Manning Child 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Manning Child (1869-1954) Mary E. Sunderland Born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on 2 February 1869, Charles Manning Child was the only surviving child of Mary Elizabeth and Charles Chauncey Child, a prosperous, old New England family. Growing up in Higganum, Connecticut, Child was interested in biology from an early age. He made extensive collections of plants and minerals on his family farm and went on to study biology at Wesleyan University, commuting from his family home. Child received his PhB in 1890 and MS in biology in 1892, and then went on to study in Leipzig after his parents death. 2007-10-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Nardell Stiles 1928-08-18 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am
Charles O. Metz 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Otis Whitman (1842-1910) D. Brian Schuermann Charles Otis Whitman was an extremely curious and driven researcher who was not content to limit himself to one field of expertise. Among the fields of study to which he made significant contributions were: embryology; morphology, or the form of living organisms and the relationships between their structures; natural history; and behavior. 2009-01-21 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles R. Knight 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Raymond Greene (1901–1982) Bianca E. Zietal Charles Raymond Greene studied hormones and the effects of environmental conditions such as high-altitude on physiology in the twentieth century in the United Kingdom. Green researched frostbite and altitude sickness during his mountaineering expeditions, helping to explain how extreme environmental conditions effect respiration. Greene’s research on hormones led to a collaboration with physician Katarina Dalton that culminated in the development of the theory that progesterone caused premenstrual syndrome, a theory that became the basis for later research on the condition. 2017-04-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Renn 1930s?-1949? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Robert Cantor (1942- ) Alexis Abboud Charles Robert Cantor helped sequence the human genome, and he developed methods to non-invasively determine the genes in human fetuses. Cantor worked in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His early research focused on oligonucleotides, small molecules of DNA or RNA. That research enabled the development of a technique that Cantor subsequently used to describe nucleotide sequences of DNA, a process called sequencing, in humans. Cantor was the principal scientist for the Human Genome Project, for which scientists sequenced the entirety of the human genome in 2003. 2015-06-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles S. Shoup 1927-1928, 1930-1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles V. Morrill 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Vincent Taylor 1922 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am
Charles W. Hargitt 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles W. Metz 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Weiss 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charles Zeleny 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Charlotte Haywood undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Chia Chi Wang 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Children of Professors on Gansett Beach Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1930 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Chin-Chih Jao 1933-1934 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Christian Heinrich Pander (1794-1865) Stephen C. Ruffenach Christian Heinrich Pander, often remembered as the father of embryology, also explored the fields of osteology, zoology, geology, and anatomy. He was born in Riga, Latvia, on 24 July 1794. Pander, with an eclectic history of research, is best remembered for his discovery and explanation of the structure of the chick blastoderm, a term he coined. In doing so, Pander was able to achieve the goal set forth by his teacher, Ignaz Döllinger, to reinvigorate the study of the chick embryo as a means of further exploring the science of embryology as a whole. 2009-07-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Christiane Nusslein-Volhard (1942- ) Jack Resnik, Catherine May Christiane Nusslein-Volhard studied how genes control embryonic development in flies and in fish in Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In the 1970s, Nusslein-Volhard focused her career on studying the genetic control of development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In 1988, Nusslein-Volhard identified the first described morphogen, a protein coded by the gene bicoid in flies. In 1995, along with Eric F. Wieschaus and Edward B. 2012-02-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Christine Ladd-Franklin 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Christopher C. Hentschel 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Clarence Erwin McClung 1930 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:05am

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