People

Titlesort descending By Description Created Last modified
Farris H. Woods 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Father Frank Pavone (1959- ) Katherine Brind'Amour Father Frank Pavone, a key proponent of the Roman Catholic Church's pro-life movement, has devoted his life's work to ending abortion, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell research, and other techniques and procedures that he believes threaten human life from conception to death. His contributions to the pro-life movement include founding a new religious order called the Missionaries of the Gospel of Life and participating in high-profile protests and television interviews for the pro-life cause. 2008-02-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Felix Anton Dohrn Karen Wellner, Kal Clark, Brian Schuermann Felix Anton Dohrn is best remembered as the founder of the Stazione Zoologica di Napoli, the world' s first permanent laboratory devoted to the study of marine organisms. Dohrn was born on 29 December 1840 in Stettin, Pomerania (now Poland), to a wealthy merchant family. Dohrn's paternal grandfather, Heinrich, trained as a surgeon and then established a sugar refinery, while Dohrn's father, Carl August Dohrn, who inherited the family business, became interested in natural history through Alexander von Humboldt, a family friend. 2011-02-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:58am
Felix Bernstein 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Ferdinand J. Sichel 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Fernandus Payne 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Florence L. Lowther 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Florence Peebles 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Florence Rena Sabin (1871-1953) Kimberly A. Buettner Florence Rena Sabin had successful careers as both a researcher and public health reformer. When Johns Hopkins University Medical School opened, accepting women and men on the same basis, Sabin was one of the first to enter. After the successful completion of her MD degree, Sabin went on to become the first female faculty member and later full-time professor at Johns Hopkins. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Floyd M. Soule 1930s?-1949? 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Fly Room at Columbia Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Fortunio Liceti (1577–1657) Anna Guerrero Fortunio Liceti studied natural philosophy and medicine in Italy during the first half of the seventeenth century. Liceti wrote greater than seventy works on a wide range of topics, including the human soul, reproduction, and birth defects observed in animals and human infants. In the seventeenth century, people commonly addressed birth defects using superstition and considered them as signs of evil, possibly caused by spiritual or supernatural entities. Liceti described infants with birth defects as prodigies and monsters to be admired and studied rather than feared. 2018-06-25 4 Jul 2018 - 11:44:03pm
Francesco Redi (1626-1698) Kimberly A. Buettner Francesco Redi, son of Florentine physician Cecilia de' Ghinci and Gregorio Redi, was born in Arezzo, Italy, on 18 February 1626. He studied philosophy and medicine at the University of Pisa, graduating on 1 May 1647. A year later, Redi moved to Florence and registered at the Collegio Medico. There he served at the Medici Court as both the head physician and superintendent of the ducal pharmacy and foundry. Redi was also a member of the Accademia del Cimento, which flourished from 1657-1667. It was during this decade that Redi produced his most important works. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis Ernest Lloyd 1924 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:04am
Francis Galton (1822-1911) Cera R. Lawrence Sir Francis Galton was a British science writer and amateur researcher of the late nineteenth century. He contributed greatly to the fields of statistics, experimental psychology and biometry. In the history of biology, Galton is widely regarded as the originator of the early twentieth century eugenics movement. Galton published influential writings on nature versus nurture in human personality traits, developed a family study method to identify possible inherited traits, and devised laws of genetic inheritance prior to the rediscovery of Gregor Mendel's work. 2011-04-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis H. Herrick 2007-01-25 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:04am
Francis H. Herrick 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Francis Harry Compton Crick (1916-2004) Amanda Andrei Francis Harry Compton Crick, who co-discovered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in 1953 in Cambridge, England, also developed The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology, and further clarified the relationship between nucleotides and protein synthesis. Crick received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine that he shared with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins in 1962 for their discovery of the molecular structure of DNA. 2013-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis Leovey 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Francis Maitland Balfour (1851-1882) Mark A. Ulett During the 1870s and early 1880s, the British morphologist Francis Maitland Balfour contributed in important ways to the budding field of evolutionary embryology, especially through his comparative embryological approach to uncovering ancestral relationships between groups. As developmental biologist and historian Brian Hall has observed, the field of evolutionary embryology in the nineteenth century was the historical ancestor of modern-day evolutionary developmental biology. 2010-06-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:58am
Francis Marion Summers 1932-1933 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Francis O. Schmitt 1924 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Francis Sellers Collins (1950- ) Tito Carvalho Francis Sellers Collins helped lead the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, which helped describe the DNA sequence of the human genome by 2001, and he helped develop technologies used in molecular genetics while working in the US in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He directed the US National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR), which became the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), located in Bethesda, Maryland, from 1993 to 2008. 2014-04-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francois Jacob (1920-2013) Valerie Racine Francois Jacob studied in bacteria and bacteriophages at the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France, in the second half of the twentieth century. In 1965, Jacob won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Andre M. Lwoff and Jacques L. Monod for their work on the genetic control of enzyme synthesis. Jacob studied how genes control and regulate metabolic enzymes in the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) and in lysogenic bacterial systems. He contributed to theories of transcriptional gene 2014-09-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Frank H. J. Figge 1936 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank H. Pike 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank M. MacNaught 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Frank P. Knowlton 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank R. Kille 1931-1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank Rattray Lillie 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank Rattray Lillie 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frank Rattray Lillie 1922 21 Aug 2015 - 1:30:12am
Frank Rattray Lillie (1870-1947) Karen Wellner Frank R. Lillie was born in Toronto, Canada, on 27 June 1870. His mother was Emily Ann Rattray and his father was George Waddell Little, an accountant and co-owner of a wholesale drug company. While in high school Lillie took up interests in entomology and paleontology but went to the University of Toronto with the aim of studying ministry. He slowly became disillusioned with this career choice and decided to major in the natural sciences. It was during his senior year that he developed his lifelong interest in embryology. 2009-07-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Frank Walter Weymouth 1923 19 Aug 2015 - 5:10:47am
Franklin Paine Mall (1862-1917) Kimberly A. Buettner Franklin Paine Mall was born into a farming family in Belle Plaine, Iowa, on 28 September 1862. While he attended a local academy, an influential teacher fueled Mall's interest in science. From 1880-1883, he studied medicine at the University of Michigan, attaining his MD degree in 1883. William J. Mayo, who later became a famous surgeon and co-founder of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, was a classmate of Mall's. Throughout his studies at Michigan, he was influenced by Corydon L. Ford, a professor of anatomy, Victor C. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:58am
Franklin William Stahl (1929– ) Victoria Hernandez Franklin William Stahl studied DNA replication, bacteriophages, and genetic recombination in the US during the mid-twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. With his colleague Matthew Meselson, Stahl performed an experiment called the Meselson-Stahl experiment, which provided evidence for a process called semi-conservative DNA replication. Semi-conservative replication is a process in which each strand of a parental DNA double helix serves as a template for newly replicated daughter strands, so that one parental strand is conserved in every daughter double helix. 2017-07-20 15 Jan 2019 - 1:39:51am
Franz and Sally Hughes Schrader Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1919 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz Josef Kallmann (1897–1965) Jessica Resnick Franz Josef Kallmann studied the biological and genetic factors of psychological disorders in Germany and the United States in the twentieth century. His studies at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City, New York, focused on the genetic factors that cause psychiatric disorders. Kallmann was one of the first to use twins to study how a mental disorder is passed on by comparing the occurrence of epilepsy and schizophrenia in both fraternal and identical twins. 2017-04-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz Julius Keibel (1861-1929) M. Elizabeth Barnes Franz Keibel studied the embryos of humans and other animals in Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. He lived and worked in several different parts of Germany and France. Keibel drew illustrations of embryos in many stages of development. Keibel used these illustrations, which he and others in the scientific community called normal plates, to describe the development of organisms in several species of vertebrates. 2014-06-21 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz Schrader 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Franz Schrader 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frederick L. Hisaw 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731) Britta Martinez Frederik Ruysch made anatomical drawings and collected and preserved human specimens, many of which were infants and fetuses, in the Netherlands during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Ruysch had many interests, including anatomy, botany, and medicine, and he discovered structures of the lymphatic system and of the eye. His collection of preserved human specimens were used as educational tools for his students and for other physicians, and they were displayed in a museum of his own making that was open to the public. 2013-04-08 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Friedrich Tiedemann (1781-1861) Jonathon LaTourelle Friedrich Tiedemann studied the anatomy of humans and animals in the nineteenth century in Germany. He published on zoological subjects, on the heart of fish, the anatomy of amphibians and echinoderms, and the lymphatic and respiratory system in birds. In addition to his zoological anatomy, Tiedemann, working with the chemist Leopold Gmelin, published about how the digestive system functioned. 2015-07-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Fritz Baltzer 1934 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
G Dallas Hanna 1920s 6 Feb 2013 - 3:28:04am
G. A. MacCallum 1923 3 Jul 2018 - 9:41:00pm
G. B. Ray 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
G. B. Westlockie 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am
G. E. Vincent 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:41:00am

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