People

Title By Description Created Last modifiedsort descending
David Starr Jordan (1851-1931) Jill Briggs David Starr Jordan studied fish and promoted eugenics in the US during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In his work, he embraced Charles Darwin s theory of evolution and described the importance of embryology in tracing phylogenic relationships. In 1891, he became the president of Stanford University in Stanford, California. Jordan condemned war and promoted conservationist causes for the California wilderness, and he advocated for the eugenic sterilization of thousands of Americans. 2013-06-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Priscilla White (1900–1989) Blaise Castagnetti Priscilla White studied the treatment of diabetes in mothers, pregnant women, and children during the twentieth century in the US. White began working with children with Type 1 diabetes in 1924 at Elliott Proctor Joslin’s practice in Boston, Massachusetts. Type 1 diabetes is an incurable disease where the pancreas produces little to no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to use sugar from food for energy and store sugars for future use. Joslin and White co-authored many publications on children 2018-02-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edward Stuart Russell (1887-1954) Mark A. Ulett Edward Stuart Russell was born 23 March 1887 to Helen Cockburn Young and the Reverend John N. Russell in Port Glasgow, Scotland. Friends and co-workers alike knew Russell as a quiet and focused, though always kind and helpful person. Trained in classics and biology, Russell's interests drew him to the study of historical and philosophical issues in the biological sciences, particularly morphology and animal behavior. According to Nils Roll-Hansen, Russell was one of the most influential philosophers of biology in the second third of the twentieth century. 2010-06-29 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Asa A. Schaeffer 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Jerold Lucey (1926– ) Arianna Bradley Jerold Lucey studied newborn infants in the United States in the twentieth century. In the 1960s and 1970s, Lucey studied phototherapy as a treatment for jaundice, a condition in infants whose livers cannot excrete broken down red blood cells, called bilirubin, into the bloodstream at a fast enough rate. In addition to his work in jaundice, Lucey was the editor in chief for the journal Pediatrics of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 2017-06-12 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Reminiscences of Dr. Edwin Grant Conklin (1863-1952), Biologist [1 of 2] Edwin Grant Conklin 1952-11-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Wilhelm August Oscar Hertwig (1849-1922) Katherine Brind'Amour, Benjamin Garcia Wilhelm August Oscar Hertwig contributed to embryology through his studies of cells in development and his discovery that only one spermatozoon is necessary to fertilize an egg. He was born 21 April 1849 to Elise Trapp and Carl Hertwig in Hessen, Germany. After his brother Richard was born the family moved to Muhlhausen in Thuringen where the boys were educated. The two brothers later attended the university in Jena from 1868 to 1888 and studied under Ernst Haeckel, who later convinced Hertwig to leave chemistry and pursue medicine. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
St. Augustine (354-430) Katherine Brind'Amour St. Augustine of Hippo, born Aurelius Augustinus to a respectable family in the year 354 CE, is now considered one of the foremost theologians in the history of the Catholic Church. His writings, including his philosophy regarding life in the womb and the moral worth of embryos, influenced many other great thinkers of his time and throughout history. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
1895 Zoology Course Photograph on Schooner Baldwin Coolidge 1895 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edward Charles Dodds (1899-1973) Alexis Abboud Edward Charles Dodds researched the function and effects of natural and artificial hormones on the endocrine system in England during the twentieth century. Though he first worked with hormones such as insulin, Dodds focused on the effects of estrogen in the body and how to replicate those effects with artificial substances. In 1938, along with chemist Robert Robinson, Dodds synthesized the first synthetic estrogen called diethylstilbestrol. 2017-03-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Rebecca and Donald Lancefield with Mary Huettner Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Bertrand Gurdon (1933- ) Inbar Maayan, Sean Cohmer Sir John Bertrand Gurdon further developed nuclear transplantation, the technique used to clone organisms and to create stem cells, while working in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Gurdon's research built on the work of Thomas King and Robert Briggs in the United States, who in 1952 published findings that indicated that scientists could take a nucleus from an early embryonic cell and successfully transfer it into an unfertilized and enucleated egg cell. 2012-10-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799) Mary E. Sunderland Lazzaro Spallanzani's imaginative application of experimental methods, mastery of microscopy, and wide interests led him to significant contributions in natural history, experimental biology, and physiology. His detailed and thoughtful observations illuminated a broad spectrum of problems ranging from regeneration to the genesis of thunderclouds. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
David Edwin Wildt (1950- ) Caroline Appleton David Edwin Wildt developed and applied assisted reproductive technologies to conserve rare and endangered wildlife species in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He advocated genome resource banks to help preserve biodiversity, and he advocated for practical ethics to guide wildlife reproductive biologists when they use technology and environmental planning. Wildt often focused on the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), but he researched greater than fifty vertebrate species. 2014-07-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Camping in Woods Hole Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
David Baltimore (1938– ) Meilin Zhu David Baltimore studied viruses and the immune system in the US during the twentieth century. In 1975, Baltimore was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering reverse transcriptase, the enzyme used to transfer information from RNA to DNA. The discovery of reverse transcriptase contradicted the central dogma of biology at the time, which stated that the transfer of information was unidirectional from DNA, RNA, to protein. 2017-12-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (1834-1919) Karen Wellner Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel was a prominent comparative anatomist and active lecturer in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He is most well known for his descriptions of phylogenetic trees, studies of radiolarians, and illustrations of vertebrate embryos to support his biogenetic law and Darwin's work with evolution. Haeckel aggressively argued that the development of an embryo repeats or recapitulates the progressive stages of lower life forms and that by studying embryonic development one could thus study the evolutionary history of life on earth. 2010-06-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Jack Cattell 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Karl Landsteiner (1868-1943) Corey Harbison Karl Landsteiner studied blood types in Europe and in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Landsteiner won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1930 for detailing immunological reactions in the ABO blood group system. The ABO blood group system divides human blood into one of four types based on the antibodies that are present on each cell. Landsteiner's work with blood types led physicians to safely perform blood transfusions and organ transplants. 2017-02-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) Federica Turriziani Colonna Barbara McClintock worked on genetics in corn (maize) plants and spent most of her life conducting research at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Laurel Hollow, New York. McClintock's research focused on reproduction and mutations in maize, and described the phenomenon of genetic crossover in chromosomes. Through her maize mutation experiments, McClintock observed transposons, or mobile elements of genes within the chromosome, which jump around the genome. McClintock received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her research on chromosome transposition. 2014-07-05 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Gregory XIV (1535-1591) Angel Lopez Pope Gregory XIV, born Nicolo Sfondrati, reversed the bull of Pope Sixtus V, Effraenatum, under which an abortion at any time of gestation can be punished by excommunication. He supported the Aristotelian distinction between an "animated" and "unanimated" fetus, making abortion of an unanimated fetus punishable by lesser means. This decision contributed to the historical debates within the Roman Catholic Church on when a fetus has a soul, and when abortion was punishable by excommunication. 2010-06-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Gustav Jacob Born (1851-1900) Karen Wellner Gustav Jacob Born was an experimental embryologist whose original work with amphibians served as the platform for his wax-plate method of embryo modeling, heteroblastic (different tissues) and xenoplastic (similar species) transplantation methods, environmental influences on sex ratio studies, and proposed function of the corpus luteum. He was born 22 April 1851 in Kempen, Prussia, but his family moved to the larger city of Görlitz within a year after Born's birth. His father was Marcus Born, a physician and public health officer who practiced in the town of Görlitz. 2009-07-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
1893 Scientists, group 1 (Overlay) Baldwin Coolidge 1893 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. E. Woodward 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Paul Kammerer (1880-1926) Federica Turriziani Colonna Paul Kammerer conducted experiments on amphibians and marine animals at the Vivarium, a research institute in Vienna, Austria, in the early twentieth century. Kammerer bred organisms in captivity, and he induced them to develop particular adaptations, which Kammerer claimed the organismss offspring would inherit. Kammerer argued that his results demonstrated the inheritance of acquired characteristics, or Lamarckian inheritance. The Lamarckian theory of inheritance posits that individuals transmit acquired traits to their offspring. 2014-11-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Richard Woltereck (1877-1944) B. R. Erick Peirson Richard Woltereck was a German zoologist and hydrobiologist who studied aquatic animals and extended the concept of Reaktionsnorm (norm of reaction) to the study of genetics. He also provided some of the first experimental evidence for the early twentieth-century embryological theory of heredity known as cytoplasmic inheritance. Through experiments on the water flea, Daphnia, Woltereck investigated whether variation produced by environmental impacts on development could play a role in heredity and evolution. 2012-05-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Rosalind Elsie Franklin (1920-1958) Lindsey O'Connell Rosalind Elsie Franklin worked with X-ray crystallography at King's College London, UK, and she helped determine the helical structure of DNA in the early 1950s. Franklin's research helped establish molecular genetics, a field that investigates how heredity works on the molecular level. The discovery of the structure of DNA also made future research possible into the molecular basis of embryonic development, genetic disorders, and gene manipulation. 2013-11-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Bernard Sachs (1858-1944) Tiffany Nardi Bernard Sachs studied nervous system disorders in children in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the late 1880s, Sachs described the fatal genetic neurological disorder called amaurotic family idiocy, later renamed Tay-Sachs disease. The disorder degrades motor skills as well as mental abilities in affected individuals. The expected lifespan of a child with Tay-Sachs is three to five years. In addition to working on Tay-Sachs disease, Sachs described other childhood neurological and 2017-05-31 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ian Wilmut (1944- ) Inbar Maayan British embryologist Sir Ian Wilmut, best known for his work in the field of animal genetic engineering and the successful cloning of sheep, was born 7 July 1944 in Hampton Lucy, England. The family later moved to Scarborough, in the north of the country, to allow his father to accept a teaching position. There Wilmut met Gordon Whalley, head of the biology department at Scarborough High School for Boys, which Wilmut attended. 2010-11-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dixie Pelluet 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Gordon Watkins Douglas (1921-2000) Alexis Abboud Gordon Watkins Douglas researched cervical cancer, breach delivery, and treatment of high blood pressure during pregnancy in the US during the twentieth century. He worked primarily at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, New York. While at Bellevue, he worked with William E. Studdiford to develop treatments for women who contracted infections as a result of illegal abortions performed throughout the US in unsterile environments. 2014-09-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Etienne Stephane Tarnier (1828–1897) Kelsey Rebovich Etienne Stephane Tarnier was a physician who worked with premature infants in France during the nineteenth century. He worked at the Maternité Port-Royal in Paris, France, a hospital for poor pregnant women. Tarnier developed and introduced prototypes of infant incubators to the Maternité in 1881. Tarnier's incubators became standard in neonatal care, especially for premature infants, enabling doctors to save many such infants that previously would have died. 2017-07-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lynn Petra Alexander Sagan Margulis (1938-2011) Dorothy Regan Haskett Lynn Petra Alexander Sagan Margulis was an American biologist, whose work in the mid-twentieth century focused on cells living together in a mutually advantageous relationship, studied cells and mitochondria in the US during the second half of the twentieth century. She developed a theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells, that proposed two kinds of structures found in eukaryotic cells mitochondria in animals, and plastids in plantsÑwere once free-living bacteria that lived harmoniously and in close proximity to larger cells, a scenario called symbiosis. 2014-03-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Pius XI (1857-1939) Katherine Brind'Amour Pope Pius XI, born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, was born to the wealthy owner of a silk factory on 31 May 1857 in Desio, Italy. He was ordained to the priesthood at the age of eighteen, at which time he began a long life devoted to study, peacekeeping, and the betterment of societies around the world. Pius XI is noted here for his contribution to the Roman Catholic Church's early twentieth century approach to issues regarding contraception and abortion, which was presented in his December 1930 encyclical "Casti Connubii." 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Karl Wilhelm Theodor Richard von Hertwig (1850-1937) Katherine Brind'Amour, Benjamin Garcia Karl Wilhelm Theodor Richard von Hertwig is an important figure in the history of embryology for his contributions of artificial hybridization of sea urchin eggs and the formulation of his coelom theory. He was born 23 September 1850 in Friedelberg, Germany, to Elise Trapp and Carl Hertwig. Richard and his older brother Oscar began their studies at Jena under the direction of Ernst Haeckel from 1868 to 1871. In 1872 Hertwig became a lecturer in zoology at Jena while Oscar lectured in anatomy and embryology. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner in a canoe Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Calvin Blackman Bridges (1889-1938) Kevin Gleason Calvin Blackman Bridges studied chromosomes and heredity in the US throughout the early twentieth century. Bridges performed research with Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University in New York City, New York, and at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. Bridges and Morgan studied heredity in Drosophila, the common fruit fly. Throughout the early twentieth century, researchers were gathering evidence that genes, or what Gregor Mendel had called the factors that control heredity, are located on chromosomes. 2017-05-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
1895 Vertebrates Course Photograph Baldwin Coolidge 1895 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis Harry Compton Crick (1916-2004) Amanda Andrei Francis Harry Compton Crick, who co-discovered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in 1953 in Cambridge, England, also developed The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology, and further clarified the relationship between nucleotides and protein synthesis. Crick received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine that he shared with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins in 1962 for their discovery of the molecular structure of DNA. 2013-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mother Teresa (1910-1997) Katherine Brind'Amour Mother Teresa, a Roman Catholic nun known for her charitable work and attention to the poor, was born 26 August 1910. The youngest child of Albanian parents Nikola and Drane Bojaxhiu, she was christened Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu and spent her early life in the place of her birth, present-day Skopje, in the Republic of Macedonia. In addition to her unwavering devotion to serve the sick and the poor, Mother Teresa firmly defended traditional Catholic teachings on more controversial issues, such as contraception and abortion. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909-2012) Adam R. Navis Rita Levi-Montalcini is a Nobel Laureate recognized for her work in the discovery and characterization of nerve growth factor. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes the growth and maintenance of the nervous system in a developing system. The majority of her career has been devoted to investigating the many aspects of NGF. 2007-11-08 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
George Weill 1928 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Austin Bradford Hill (1897-1991) Carolina Abboud During the twentieth century, Austin Bradford Hill researched diseases and their causes in England and developed the Bradford Hill criteria, which comprise the minimal requirements that must be met for a causal relationship to be established between a factor and a disease. Hill also suggested that researchers should randomize clinical trials to evaluate the effects of a drug or treatment by monitoring large groups of people. 2017-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834-1914) Yawen Zou August Friedrich Leopold Weismann studied how the traits of organisms developed and evolved in a variety of organisms, mostly insects and aquatic animals, in Germany in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Weismann proposed the theory of the continuity of germ-plasm, a theory of heredity. Weismann postulated that germ-plasm was the hereditary material in cells, and parents transmitted to their offspring only the germ-plasm present in germ-cells (sperm and egg cells) rather than somatic or body cells. 2014-05-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Katharine McCormick (1876-1967) Aliya Buttar Katharine Dexter McCormick, who contributed the majority of funding for the development of the oral contraceptive pill, was born to Josephine and Wirt Dexter on 27 August 1875 in Dexter, Michigan. After growing up in Chicago, Illinois, she attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she graduated in 1904 with a BS in biology. That same year, she married Stanley McCormick, the son of Cyrus McCormick, inventor and manufacturer of the mechanized reaper. 2007-11-08 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Caspar Friedrich Wolff (1734-1794) Stephen Ruffenach Caspar Friedrich Wolff is most famous for his 1759 doctoral dissertation, Theoria Generationis, in which he described embryonic development in both plants and animals as a process involving layers of cells, thereby refuting the accepted theory of preformation: the idea that organisms develop as a result of the unfolding of form that is somehow present from the outset, as in a homunculus. This work generated a great deal of controversy and discussion at the time of its publication but was an integral move in the reemergence and acceptance of the theory of epigenesis. 2009-07-07 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pitching horseshoes behind Old Main Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Maurice Ralph Hilleman (1919–2005) Christian H. Ross Maurice Ralph Hilleman developed vaccines at the Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research in West Point, Pennsylvania, during the twentieth century. Over the course of his career at Merck, Hilleman created over forty vaccines, making him one of the most prolific developers of vaccine in the twentieth century. Of the fourteen vaccines commonly given to children in the US by 2015, Hilleman was responsible for eight of them. Hilleman's most widely used vaccine was his measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. 2017-04-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
George Gray and Great White Shark Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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