People

Title By Description Created Last modifiedsort descending
Lap-Chee Tsui (1950-) Kristina Winikates Lap-Chee Tsui is a geneticist who discovered the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, and his research team sequenced human chromosome 7. As the location of the cystic fibrosis gene is now known, it is possible for doctors and specialists to identify in human fetuses the mutation that causes the fatal disease. Tsui's research also outlined the mechanisms for the development of cystic fibrosis, which were previously unknown. 2011-11-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Innocent XI (1611-1689) Katherine Brind'Amour, Benjamin Garcia Pope Innocent XI, born Benedetto Odescalchi, made considerable contributions to the Roman Catholic approach to embryology by condemning several propositions on liberal moral theology in 1679, including two related to abortion and ensoulment. His rejection of these principles strengthened the Church's stance against abortion and for the idea of "hominization," meaning the presence of human qualities before birth. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William P. Procter in car in front of Old Main Building Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Margaret Ann Bulkley (James Barry) (1789−1865) Sarah Foster Margaret Ann Bulkley, under the male pseudonym James Barry, was one of the first female obstetricians in early nineteenth century British Empire. She was the first person to perform a cesarean section in South Africa. Cesarean section is a procedure in which a doctor cuts into the uterus of a pregnant woman to retrieve the fetus during complicated births. Bulkley hid her gender and lived life as the male Barry to practice medicine, an opportunity not allowed to women at the time. 2017-02-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Bertrand Gurdon (1933- ) Inbar Maayan, Sean Cohmer Sir John Bertrand Gurdon further developed nuclear transplantation, the technique used to clone organisms and to create stem cells, while working in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Gurdon's research built on the work of Thomas King and Robert Briggs in the United States, who in 1952 published findings that indicated that scientists could take a nucleus from an early embryonic cell and successfully transfer it into an unfertilized and enucleated egg cell. 2012-10-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Horace W. Feldman 1926 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Katharina Dorothea Dalton (1916–2004) Bianca Zietal Katharina Dorothea Dalton was a physician in England in the twentieth century who defined premenstrual syndrome (PMS) as a cluster of symptoms suspected to begin one to two weeks before menstruation and disappear upon the onset of a new menstrual cycle. Prior to Dalton, there was little research on pre-menstrual issues and those that existed linked the problem to excessive water retention or estrogen. Dalton hypothesized that PMS resulted from a deficiency in the hormone progesterone and advocated for hormone replacement therapy to lessen the symptoms of the syndrome. 2017-05-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731) Britta Martinez Frederik Ruysch made anatomical drawings and collected and preserved human specimens, many of which were infants and fetuses, in the Netherlands during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Ruysch had many interests, including anatomy, botany, and medicine, and he discovered structures of the lymphatic system and of the eye. His collection of preserved human specimens were used as educational tools for his students and for other physicians, and they were displayed in a museum of his own making that was open to the public. 2013-04-08 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz and Sally Hughes Schrader Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1919 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Craig Venter (1946- ) Tito Carvalho John Craig Venter helped map the genomes of humans, fruitflies, and other organisms in the US in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and he helped develop an organism with a synthetic genome. In February 2001, Venter and his team published a human genome sequence after using a technique known as Expressed Sequence Tags, or ESTs. Venter worked to bridge commercial investment with scientific research. Venter founded a number of private companies, including the for-profit Celera Genomics, headquartered in Alameda, California, as well as research institutes, such as the not-for-profit J. 2014-05-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Jane Maienschein (1950- ) EP Editorial Team Jane Maienschein is the daughter of Joyce Kylander and Fred Maienschein, and was born in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on 23 September 1950. She attended MIT as a freshman and then transferred to Yale University in 1969 when Yale decided to admit women undergraduates. In 1972 she graduated with an honors degree in History, the Arts, and Letters having written a thesis on the history of science. She then attended Indiana University and studied with historian of embryology Frederick B. 2008-10-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John D. Gearhart Ke Wu John D. Gearhart is a renowned American developmental geneticist best known for leading the Johns Hopkins University research team that first identified and isolated human pluripotent stem cells from human primordial germ cells, the precursors of fully differentiated germ cells. Born in Western Pennsylvania, Gearhart lived on the family farm located in the Allegheny Mountains for the first six years of his life. 2011-01-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. Sturtevant Collecting Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920s 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Paul Kammerer (1880-1926) Federica Turriziani Colonna Paul Kammerer conducted experiments on amphibians and marine animals at the Vivarium, a research institute in Vienna, Austria, in the early twentieth century. Kammerer bred organisms in captivity, and he induced them to develop particular adaptations, which Kammerer claimed the organismss offspring would inherit. Kammerer argued that his results demonstrated the inheritance of acquired characteristics, or Lamarckian inheritance. The Lamarckian theory of inheritance posits that individuals transmit acquired traits to their offspring. 2014-11-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner collecting in the marsh Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Benedict Davenport (1866-1944) Cera R. Lawrence Charles Benedict Davenport was an early twentieth-century experimental zoologist. Davenport founded both the Station for Experimental Evolution and the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor in New York. Though he was a talented statistician and skilled scientist, Davenport's scientific achievements are eclipsed by his lasting legacy as the scientific leader of the eugenics movement in the US. 2011-05-12 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Carl Gottfried Hartman (1879-1968) Giavonna A. Goodman Carl Gottfried Hartman researched the reproductive physiology of opossums and rhesus monkeys. He was the first to extensively study the embryology and physiology of reproduction in opossums when little was known about this mammal. Hartman worked in Texas where opossums, the only marsupial that lives in North America, were abundant. The female opossum delivers her fetal opossums in her pouch, where one can easily observe their development. After studying opossums for thirteen years, Hartman investigated the reproductive physiology of rhesus monkeys, also known as macaques. 2011-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Raymond Greene (1901–1982) Bianca E. Zietal Charles Raymond Greene studied hormones and the effects of environmental conditions such as high-altitude on physiology in the twentieth century in the United Kingdom. Green researched frostbite and altitude sickness during his mountaineering expeditions, helping to explain how extreme environmental conditions effect respiration. Greene’s research on hormones led to a collaboration with physician Katarina Dalton that culminated in the development of the theory that progesterone caused premenstrual syndrome, a theory that became the basis for later research on the condition. 2017-04-27 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles B. Atwell 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edmund Beecher Wilson (1856-1939) Jane Maienschein Edmund Beecher Wilson contributed to cell biology, the study of cells, in the US during the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. His three editions of The Cell in Development and Inheritance (or Heredity) in 1896, 1900, and 1925 introduced generations of students to cell biology. In The Cell, Wilson described the evidence and theories of his time about cells and identified topics for future study. He helped show how each part of the cell works during cell division and in every step of early development of an organism. 2013-08-05 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Katsuma Dan on his first meeting with Victor Heilbrunn Katsuma Dan Katsuma Dan reflects on his first meeting with Dr. Victor Heilbrunn at the University of Pennsylvania in December 1930. Recorded at the University of Washington, Friday Harbor group in 1978. 1978 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren (1927-2007) Aroob Khokhar Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren was a developmental biologist known for her work with embryology in the twentieth century. McLaren was the first researcher to grow mouse embryos outside of the womb. She experimented by culturing mouse eggs and successfully developing them into embryos, leading to advancements with in vitro fertilization. 2010-06-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Philip Fischelis 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Oliver Allison Ryder III (1946– ) Karen Love, Renee Bailey Oliver Allison Ryder studied chromosomal evolution and endangered species in efforts for wildlife conservation and preservation at the San Diego Zoo in San Diego, California. Throughout his career, Ryder studied breeding patterns of endangered species. He collected and preserved cells, tissues, and DNA from endangered and extinct species to store in the San Diego Frozen Zoo, a center for genetic research and development in San Diego, California. 2017-09-14 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lynn Petra Alexander Sagan Margulis (1938-2011) Dorothy Regan Haskett Lynn Petra Alexander Sagan Margulis was an American biologist, whose work in the mid-twentieth century focused on cells living together in a mutually advantageous relationship, studied cells and mitochondria in the US during the second half of the twentieth century. She developed a theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells, that proposed two kinds of structures found in eukaryotic cells mitochondria in animals, and plastids in plantsÑwere once free-living bacteria that lived harmoniously and in close proximity to larger cells, a scenario called symbiosis. 2014-03-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Columbia Gang Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1920 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Robert Alan Good (1922-2003) Angel Lopez Robert Alan Good was an American physician and scientific researcher who explored the cellular mechanisms of immunity. His research and discoveries earned him the label of "father of modern immunology." Though his work in immunology is considered his greatest scientific achievement, Good is also well known for his work with tissue engineering. From his research on immunology, Good was able to perform the first successful allogeneic (donor and recipient are unrelated) bone marrow transplant. 2010-11-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stanley Cohen (1922- ) Adam R. Navis Stanley Cohen is a biochemist who participated in the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). He shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Rita Levi-Montalcini for their work on the discovery of growth factors. His work led to the discovery of many other growth factors and their roles in development. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Samuel W. Geiser 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Marcello Malpighi (1646-1694) Cera R. Lawrence Marcello Malpighi studied chick embryos with microscopes in Italy during the seventeenth century. Trained as a medical doctor, he was among the first scientists to use the microscope to examine embryos at very early stages. Malpighi described early structures in chick embryos, and later scientists used his descriptions to help develop the theory of preformationism. 2008-09-12 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ian Donald (1910–1987) Nicole Erjavic Ian Donald was an obstetrician who developed the technology and therapy of ultrasound diagnostics during the twentieth century in Europe. Ultrasound is a medical diagnostic technique that uses sound waves to produce images of the inside of the body. During the early 1900s, physicians had no way to see inside a woman’s uterus during pregnancy. Donald developed the first method of scanning human internal anatomy in real time, which enabled doctors to diagnose potentially fatal tumors and cysts. 2018-01-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Muriel Wheldale Onslow (1880-1932) Samantha Hauserman Muriel Wheldale Onslow studied flowers in England with genetic and biochemical techniques in the early twentieth century. Working with geneticist William Bateson, Onslow used Mendelian principles and biochemical analysis together to understand the inheritance of flower colors at the beginning of the twentieth century. Onslow's study of snapdragons, or Antirrhinum majus, resulted in her description of epistasis, a phenomenon in which the phenotypic effect of one gene is influenced by one or more other genes. She discovered several biochemicals related to color formation. 2013-10-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Charles Knight and Robert Chambers 1931 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sheldon Clark Reed (1910-2003) Cassidy Possehl Sheldon Clark Reed helped establish the profession of genetic counseling in the US during the twentieth century. In 1947 Reed coined the term genetic counseling to describe the interaction of a doctor explaining to a patient the likelihood of passing a certain trait to their offspring. With physicians being able to test for genetic abnormalities like cystic fibrosis, Reed helped trained individuals give patients the tools to make informed decisions. In 1955 Reed published the book Counseling in Medical Genetics. 2017-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
August Friedrich Leopold Weismann (1834-1914) Yawen Zou August Friedrich Leopold Weismann studied how the traits of organisms developed and evolved in a variety of organisms, mostly insects and aquatic animals, in Germany in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Weismann proposed the theory of the continuity of germ-plasm, a theory of heredity. Weismann postulated that germ-plasm was the hereditary material in cells, and parents transmitted to their offspring only the germ-plasm present in germ-cells (sperm and egg cells) rather than somatic or body cells. 2014-05-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Dr. and Mrs. E. P. Lyo 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Pius IX (1792-1878) Angel Lopez Pope Pius IX, born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, marked his contribution to the abortion debate by removing the distinction between an "animated" and "unanimated" fetus from Catholic doctrine, and established the edict that a human should be protected starting from the moment of conception onward. This proclamation made abortion at any time of gestation punishable by excommunication. Pope Pius IX's decision became Canon Law of the Catholic Church. 2010-07-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895) Samantha Hauserman In nineteenth century Great Britain, Thomas Henry Huxley proposed connections between the development of organisms and their evolutionary histories, critiqued previously held concepts of homology, and promoted Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. Many called him Darwin's Bulldog. Huxley helped professionalize and redefine British science. He wrote about philosophy, religion, and social issues, and researched and theorized in many biological fields. 2013-11-26 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Mary Huettner Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Hermann Joseph Muller (1890-1967) Kevin Gleason Hermann Joseph Muller studied the effects of x-ray radiation on genetic material in the US during the twentieth century. At that time, scientists had yet to determine the dangers that x-rays presented. In 1927, Muller demonstrated that x-rays, a form of high-energy radiation, can mutate the structure of genetic material. Muller warned others of the dangers of radiation, advising radiologists to protect themselves and their patients from radiation. He also opposed the indiscriminate use of radiation in medical and industrial fields. 2017-05-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Benjamin C. Gruenberg 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Clifford Grobstein (1916-1998) Brad Jacobson Clifford Grobstein was a traditional, influential, and highly innovative biologist of the mid-twentieth century, gifted with many character facets and pragmatic talents. His early adulthood passion of linking classical embryology with developmental anatomy and medicine was joined by his later pursuit of combining research ethics and science education with public policy. 2010-11-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Hilde Mangold (1898-1924) Maria Doty Hilde Mangold, previously Hilde Proescholdt, was a German embryologist and physiologist who became well known for research completed with Hans Spemann in the 1920s. As a graduate student, Mangold assisted Spemann and together they discovered and coined the term the "organizer." The organizer discovery was a crucial contribution to embryology that led to further understanding of the pattern of embryo differentiation of amphibians. 2011-05-09 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Ernest John Christopher Polge (1926-2006) Renee Bailey Twentieth-century researcher Ernest John Christopher Polge studied the reproductive processes of livestock and determined a method to successfully freeze, thaw, and utilize viable sperm cells to produce offspring in animals. In 1949, Polge identified glycerol as a cryoprotectant, or a medium that enables cells to freeze without damaging their cellular components or functions. Several years later, Polge used glycerol in a freezing process called vitrification, which enabled him to freeze poultry sperm, thaw that sperm, and use it to fertilize vertebrate embryos. 2018-01-30 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
August Antonius Rauber (1841-1917) Maria Doty August Antonius Rauber was an embryologist and anatomist who examined gastrulation in avian embryos. He examined the formation of the blastopore, epiblast, and primitive streak during chick development. Subsequent researchers have further studied Rauber's findings, which has led to new discoveries in embryology and developmental biology. 2011-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Sturtevant and Huettner standing by their canoe Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Hunter (1728–1793) Nevada Wagoner John Hunter studied human reproductive anatomy, and in eighteenth century England, performed one of the earliest described cases of artificial insemination. Hunter dissected thousands of animals and human cadavers to study the structures and functions of organ systems. Much of his anatomical studies focused on the circulatory, digestive, and reproductive systems. He helped to describe the exchange of blood between pregnant women and their fetuses. Hunter also housed various natural collections, as well as thousands of preserved specimens from greater than thirty years of anatomy work. 2017-02-17 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William Bateson (1861-1926) Samantha Hauserman At the turn of the twentieth century, William Bateson studied organismal variation and heredity of traits within the framework of evolutionary theory in England. Bateson applied Gregor Mendel's work to Charles Darwin's theory of evolution and coined the term genetics for a new biological discipline. By studying variation and advocating Mendelian genetics, Bateson furthered the field of genetics, encouraged the use of experimental methodology to study heredity, and contributed to later theories of genetic inheritance. 2014-01-28 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Sixtus V (1520-1590) Katherine Brind'Amour Known for dropping a long-held distinction in the Catholic Church between the animated and unanimated fetus, Felice Peretti was born in Grottamare, Italy, in 1521, son of a Dalmatian gardener. In his early years, Peretti worked as a swineherd, but soon became involved in the local Minorite convent in Montalto, where he served as a novice at the age of twelve. He went on to study in Montalto, Ferrara, and Bologna, continuing his devotion to religious life, and in 1547 Peretti was ordained as priest in the city of Siena. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
William Harvey (1578-1657) Angel Lopez Renowned physician and scientist William Harvey is best known for his accurate description of how blood circulates through the body. While his published work on the circulation of blood is considered the most important of his academic life, Harvey also made significant contributions to embryology with the publication of his book Exercitationes de Generatione Animalium in 1651. In this book he established several theories that would set the stage for modern embryology and addressed many embryological issues including conception, embryogenesis, and spontaneous generation. 2010-06-18 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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