People

Title By Description Created Last modifiedsort descending
Andrew Zachary Fire (1959- ) Catherine May Andrew Zachary Fire is a professor at Stanford University and Nobel Laureate. Fire worked at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Embryology in Baltimore, Maryland, with colleague Craig Mello, where they discovered that RNA molecules could be used to turn off or knock out the expression of genes. Fire and Mello called the process RNA interference (RNAi), and won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2006 for their discovery. 2011-11-28 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Victor Ambros (1953-) Catherine May, Justin M. Wolter Victor Ambros is a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and he discovered the first microRNA (miRNA) in 1993. Ambros researched the genetic control of developmental timing in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and he helped describe gene function and regulation during the worm’s development and embryogenesis. His discovery of miRNA marked the beginning of research into a form of genetic regulation found throughout diverse life forms from plants to humans. Ambros is a central figure in the miRNA and C. 2012-05-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
E.B.Wilson with daughter Nancy Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy Federica Turriziani Colonna The Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn (Anton Dohrn Zoological Station) is a public research institute focusing on biology and biodiversity. Hereafter called the Station, it was founded in Naples, Italy, in 1872 by Anton Dohrn. The type of research conducted at the Station has varied since it was created, though initial research focused on embryology. At the turn of the twentieth century, researchers at the Station established the sea urchin (Echinoidea) as a model organism for embryological research. 2014-12-22 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Paul VI (1897-1978) Katherine Brind'Amour, Benjamin Garcia Pope Paul VI, born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini, has been crucial to the clarification of Roman Catholic views on embryos and abortion in recent history. His 1968 encyclical "Humanae Vitae" spoke to the regulation of birth through various methods of contraception and sterilization. This encyclical, a result of Church hesitancy to initiate widespread discussion of the issue in a council of the Synod of Bishops, led to much controversy in the Church but established a firm Catholic position on the issues of birth control and family planning. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866-1945) Mary E. Sunderland Although best known for his work with the fruit fly, for which he earned a Nobel Prize and the title "The Father of Genetics," Thomas Hunt Morgan's contributions to biology reach far beyond genetics. His research explored questions in embryology, regeneration, evolution, and heredity, using a variety of approaches. 2007-09-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Camping on Elizabeth Islands Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Columbia Gang Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1921 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Francis Sellers Collins (1950- ) Tito Carvalho Francis Sellers Collins helped lead the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, which helped describe the DNA sequence of the human genome by 2001, and he helped develop technologies used in molecular genetics while working in the US in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He directed the US National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR), which became the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), located in Bethesda, Maryland, from 1993 to 2008. 2014-04-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope John Paul II (1920-2005) Katherine Brind'Amour, Benjamin Garcia Pope John Paul II's views on abortion and embryology have been very influential to the Roman Catholic Church. He strictly forbade abortion and other threats to what he regarded as early human life in his encyclical entitled "Evangelium Vitae," meaning the "Gospel of Life." His authority on moral and social issues was highly regarded during his lifetime. 2007-11-11 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Warren Harmon Lewis (1870-1964) Kimberly A. Buettner As one of the first to work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington Department of Embryology, Warren Harmon Lewis made a number of contributions to the field of embryology. In addition to his experimental discoveries on muscle development and the eye, Lewis also published and revised numerous works of scientific literature, including papers in the Carnegie Contributions to Embryology and five editions of Gray's Anatomy. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. Beerman 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Etienne Stephane Tarnier (1828–1897) Kelsey Rebovich Etienne Stephane Tarnier was a physician who worked with premature infants in France during the nineteenth century. He worked at the Maternité Port-Royal in Paris, France, a hospital for poor pregnant women. Tarnier developed and introduced prototypes of infant incubators to the Maternité in 1881. Tarnier's incubators became standard in neonatal care, especially for premature infants, enabling doctors to save many such infants that previously would have died. 2017-07-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Roy John Britten (1919-2012) Abhinav Mishra Roy John Britten studied DNA sequences in the US in the second half of the twentieth century, and he helped discover repetitive elements in DNA sequences. Additionally, Britten helped propose models and concepts of gene regulatory networks. Britten studied the organization of repetitive elements and, analyzing data from the Human Genome Project, he found that the repetitive elements in DNA segments do not code for proteins, enzymes, or cellular parts. Britten hypothesized that repetitive elements helped cause cells to 2014-10-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Reminiscences of Dr. Edwin Grant Conklin (1863-1952), Biologist [2 of 2] Edwin Grant Conklin 1952-11-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Abraham Trembley (1710-1784) Mary E. Sunderland Abraham Trembley's discovery of the remarkable regenerative capacity of the hydra caused many to question their beliefs about the generation of organisms. Born 3 September 1710 to a prominent Geneva family, Trembley studied at the Calvin Institute, now the University of Geneva, where he completed his thesis on calculus. He went on to become tutor for Count William Bentinck's two sons, and it was while teaching the boys natural history that Trembley came across a strange organism in a sample of pond water. 2007-10-31 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Hans Spemann (1869-1941) Karen Wellner Hans Spemann was an experimental embryologist best known for his transplantation studies and as the originator of the "organizer" concept. One of his earliest experiments involved constricting the blastomeres of a fertilized salamander egg with a noose of fine baby hair, resulting in a partially double embryo with two heads and one tail. 2010-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. C. Warren undated 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Calvin Blackman Bridges (1889-1938) Kevin Gleason Calvin Blackman Bridges studied chromosomes and heredity in the US throughout the early twentieth century. Bridges performed research with Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University in New York City, New York, and at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. Bridges and Morgan studied heredity in Drosophila, the common fruit fly. Throughout the early twentieth century, researchers were gathering evidence that genes, or what Gregor Mendel had called the factors that control heredity, are located on chromosomes. 2017-05-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Georges Cuvier (1769-1832) Valerie Racine Georges Cuvier, baptized Georges Jean-Leopold Nicolas-Frederic Cuvier, was a professor of anatomy at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, through the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Scholars recognize Cuvier as a founder of modern comparative anatomy, and as an important contributor to vertebrate paleontology and geology. Cuvier studied the form and function of animal anatomy, writing four volumes on quadruped fossils and co-writing eleven volumes on the natural history of fish with Achille Valenciennes. 2013-07-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan, E.B. Wilson and others having a picnic Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Simone Mary Campbell (1945–) Claire Cleveland Simone Campbell is a Roman Catholic sister, attorney, and poet who advocated for social justice, especially equal access to healthcare in the US in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Campbell worked as a lawyer and served the working poor in California. As of 2018, she works for NETWORK, a lobbying group in Washington DC that focuses on broadening access to healthcare by lowering costs. 2018-06-25 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Edward Drinker Cope (1840-1897) Karla T. Moeller Edward Drinker Cope studied fossils and anatomy in the US in the late nineteenth century. Based on his observations of skeletal morphology, Cope developed a novel mechanism to explain the law of parallelism, the idea that developing organisms successively pass through stages resembling their ancestors. Others had proposed the addition of new body forms at the end of an individual organism's developed as a mechanism through which new species arose, but those proposals relied on changes in the lengths of gestation or incubation. 2012-01-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
W. E. Garry 1922 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Austin Bradford Hill (1897-1991) Carolina Abboud During the twentieth century, Austin Bradford Hill researched diseases and their causes in England and developed the Bradford Hill criteria, which comprise the minimal requirements that must be met for a causal relationship to be established between a factor and a disease. Hill also suggested that researchers should randomize clinical trials to evaluate the effects of a drug or treatment by monitoring large groups of people. 2017-06-15 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Carl Richard Moore (1892-1955) Mary Drago Carl Richard Moore was a professor and researcher at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois who studied sex hormones in animals from 1916 until his death in 1955. Moore focused on the role of hormones on sex differentiation in offspring, the optimal conditions for sperm production, and the effects of vasectomy or testicular implants on male sex hormone production. Moore's experiments to create hermaphrodites in the laboratory contributed to the theory of a feedback loop between the pituitary and fetal gonadal hormones to control sex differentiation. 2014-02-18 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Patrick Christopher Steptoe (1913-1988) Andrew Danielson Patrick Christopher Steptoe was a British gynecologist responsible for major advances in gynecology and reproductive technology. Throughout his career Steptoe promoted laparoscopy, a minimally invasive surgical technique that allows a view inside the abdominal cavity, successfully advancing its usefulness in gynecology. After partnering with embryologist Robert Edwards in 1966, the pair performed the first in vitro fertilization in humans. 2009-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Joseph King Jr. (1921-2000) Sean Cohmer Thomas Joseph King Jr. was a developmental biologist who, with fellow scientist Robert Briggs, pioneered a method of transplanting nuclei from blastula cells into fresh egg cells lacking nuclei. This method, dubbed nuclear transplantation, facilitated King's studies on cancer cell development. King's work was instrumental for the development of cloning of fish, insects, and mammals. 2012-01-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Bell Tower Millfield Street Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1930 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Maurice Ralph Hilleman (1919–2005) Christian H. Ross Maurice Ralph Hilleman developed vaccines at the Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research in West Point, Pennsylvania, during the twentieth century. Over the course of his career at Merck, Hilleman created over forty vaccines, making him one of the most prolific developers of vaccine in the twentieth century. Of the fourteen vaccines commonly given to children in the US by 2015, Hilleman was responsible for eight of them. Hilleman's most widely used vaccine was his measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. 2017-04-13 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
L. Hoadley 1923 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen (1857-1927) B. R. Erick Peirson Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen studied plants and helped found the field of genetics, contributing methods and concepts to the study of heredity around the turn of the twentieth century in Denmark. His experiments on heredity and variation in plants influenced the methods and techniques of geneticists, and his distinction between the genotype of an organism-its hereditary disposition-and its phenotype-its observable characteristics-remains at the core of contemporary biology. Johannsen criticized biological explanations that relied on concepts such as vitalism and teleology. 2012-11-16 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Alfred F. (Alfred Francis) Huettner 1918 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Annie Dodge Wauneka (1910-1997) Lakshmeeramya Malladi Annie Dodge Wauneka, a member of the Navajo Tribal Council in Window Rock, Arizona, from 1951 to 1978, advocated for improved lifestyle, disease prevention, and access to medical knowledge in the Navajo Indian Reservation, later renamed the Navajo Nation. Wauneka served as chair of the Health and Welfare Committee of the Navajo Tribal Council and as a member of the US Surgeon General’s Advisory Committee on Indian Health. Wauneka advocated for initiatives aimed at promoting education, preventing tuberculosis, and reducing the infant mortality rate. 2017-12-19 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Jacques Loeb (1859-1924) Steve Elliott Jacques Loeb experimented on embryos in Europe and the United States at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Among the first to study embryos through experimentation, Loeb helped found the new field of experimental embryology. Notably, Loeb showed scientists how to create artificial parthenogenesis, thus refuting the idea that spermatozoa alone were necessary to develop eggs into embryos and confirming the idea that the chemical constitution of embryos environment affected their development. 2009-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
H. Knower 1925 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (1921-2011) Jennifer R. Craer Rosalyn Sussman Yalow co-developed the radioimmunoassay (RIA), a method used to measure minute biological compounds that cause immune systems to produce antibodies. Yalow and research partner Solomon A. Berson developed the RIA in the early 1950s at the Bronx Veterans Administration (VA) Hospital, in New York City, New York. Yalow and Berson's methods expanded scientific research, particularly in the medical field, and contributed to medical diagnostics. For this achievement, Yalow received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1977. 2013-09-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
James William Kitching (1922-2003) Paige Madison James William Kitching collected and studied fossils of dinosaurs and early humans in the twentieth century. He worked at the Bernard Price Institute for Paleontological Research in South Africa. During the fifty-three years he worked at the institute, Kitching spent eighteen of those in the field uncovering fossils. Kitching recovered fossils of early human ancestors, later called Australopithecines, as well as fossils of dinosaurs and ancient mammals. When he died in 2003, the Bernard Price Institute housed one of the largest fossil collections in the southern hemisphere. 2015-03-31 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Pope Pius XII (1876-1958) Katherine Brind'Amour Pope Pius XII was born Eugenio Maria Giuseppi Giovanni Pacelli on 2 March 1876 in Rome, Italy, to Virginia and Filippo Pacelli. Known for his oft-disputed role in the Roman Catholic Church's approach to the Nazis and World War II, Pope Pius XII also contributed a number of important documents regarding conception, fertility, abortion, and reproductive control to the Vatican's collection of writings and doctrine on procreation. 2010-06-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Samuel Randall Detwiler (1890-1957) Adam R. Navis Samuel Randall Detwiler was an embryologist who studied neural development in embryos and vertebrate retinas. He discovered evidence for the relationship between somites and spinal ganglia, that transplanted limbs can be controlled by foreign ganglia, and the plasticity of ganglia in response to limb transplantations. He also extensively studied vertebrate retinas during and after embryonic development. 2007-11-01 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
1893 Instructors (Overlay) Baldwin Coolidge 1893 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Paul Eugen Bleuler (1857–1939) Jessica Resnick Paul Eugen Bleuler studied autism and schizophrenia, among other psychiatric disorders, throughout continental Europe in the early twentieth century. Bleuler worked as a psychiatrist caring for patients with psychiatric disorders at a variety of facilities in Europe. In 1908, Bleuler coined the term schizophrenia to describe a group of diseases that cause changes in thought processes and behavior in humans as well as difficulties relating to the world. 2017-04-06 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Harald zur Hausen (1936–) Grace Kim Harald zur Hausen studied viruses and discovered that certain strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV), a sexually transmitted disease, can cause cervical cancer, in Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Zur Hausen spent his research career identifying the viruses that cause diseases, particularly cancer-causing viruses (oncoviruses). He primarily focused on HPV and cervical cancer. Zur Hausen hypothesized that HPV was cancerous and discovered that two strains, HPV 16 and 18, caused cervical cancer. 2017-07-24 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Carey H. Bostian 1935 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Richard Doll (1912–2005) Phil Gaetano Richard Doll was an epidemiologist and public figure in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Working primarily at the University of Oxford, in Oxford, England, Doll established a definitive correlation between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Furthermore, Doll’s work helped legitimize epidemiology as a scientific discipline. Doll’s research also helped establish modern guidelines for oncological studies, as well as for contemporary and future research on the effect of smoking on pregnancy and fetal development. 2017-09-20 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
John Spangler Nicholas (1895-1963) Ellen M. Dupont John Spangler Nicholas, an American biologist, was born on 10 March 1895 in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. He was the only child of Elizabeth Ellen Spangler, a teacher, and Samuel Trauger Nicholas, a Lutheran minister. Nicholas held myriad administrative positions throughout his life and his contributions to biology spanned several sub-disciplines, but his most notable accomplishments were in the field of embryology. 2008-07-23 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
1895 Vertebrates Course Photograph (Overlay) Baldwin Coolidge 1895 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Walter Edward Dandy (1886-1946) Alexandra Bohnenberger Walter Edward Dandy studied abnormalities in the developing human brain in the United States in the twentieth century. He collaborated with pediatrician Kenneth Blackfan to provide the first clinical description of Dandy-Walker Syndrome, a congenital brain malformation in which the medial part of the brain, called the cerebellar vermis, is absent. Dandy also described the circulation of cerebral spinal fluid, the clear, watery fluid that surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord. 2017-03-02 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Franz Julius Keibel (1861-1929) M. Elizabeth Barnes Franz Keibel studied the embryos of humans and other animals in Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. He lived and worked in several different parts of Germany and France. Keibel drew illustrations of embryos in many stages of development. Keibel used these illustrations, which he and others in the scientific community called normal plates, to describe the development of organisms in several species of vertebrates. 2014-06-21 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am
Lap-Chee Tsui (1950-) Kristina Winikates Lap-Chee Tsui is a geneticist who discovered the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, and his research team sequenced human chromosome 7. As the location of the cystic fibrosis gene is now known, it is possible for doctors and specialists to identify in human fetuses the mutation that causes the fatal disease. Tsui's research also outlined the mechanisms for the development of cystic fibrosis, which were previously unknown. 2011-11-10 4 Jul 2018 - 4:40:59am

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