“Perspectives on the Properties of Stem Cells” (2005), by Ernest McCulloch and James Till

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“The Impact of Emotional and Physical Violence During Pregnancy on Maternal and Child Health at One Year Post-partum” (2011), by Sarah McMahon, Chien-Chung Huang, Paul Boxer, Judy L. Postmus

“The Impact of Emotional and Physical Violence During Pregnancy on Maternal and Child Health at One Year Post-partum” (2011), by Sarah McMahon, Chien-Chung Huang, Paul Boxer, Judy L. Postmus

“Invasive and Non-invasive Methods for the Diagnosis of Endometriosis” (2010), by Albert L. Hsu, Izabella Khachikyan, and Pamela Stratton

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Impact of Air Pollution on Reproductive Health” (1999), by Radim Srám

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Zidovudine or azidothymidine

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Priscilla White (1900–1989)

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Roger Sperry’s Split Brain Experiments (1959–1968)

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HIP Randomized Breast Cancer Screening Trial (1963–1982)

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The Jane Collective (1969–1973)

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Albert William Liley (1929–1983)

Albert William Liley (1929–1983) Editor's note: This article was updated on July 7, 2020. Albert William Liley advanced the science of fetal physiology and the techniques of life-saving in utero blood transfusions for fetuses with Rh incompatibility, also known as hemolytic disease. Due to his advances, fetuses too young to survive premature delivery, and likely to die in utero if their Rh incompatibilities were left untreated, were successfully transfused and carried to term. Liley was as passionate as a clinician and researcher as he was about his views on the rights of the fetuses.