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Emil von Behring (1854–1917)

Emil von Behring (1854–1917)

Ernst Gräfenberg (1881–1957)

Ernst Gräfenberg (1881–1957)

Gender-affirming Mastectomy

Gender-affirming Mastectomy

Luc Antoine Montagnier (1932-2022)

Luc Antoine Montagnier (1932-2022)

NuvaRing

NuvaRing

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1975)

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1975) In 1975, the United States Congress passed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, referred to as the IDEA, which codified the right of all American children to a free and appropriate public education regardless of disability status. The IDEA requires all public schools that accept federal funds to provide education that meets the needs of students with disabilities at the public expense. Prior to IDEA, many students with disabilities went without any educational opportunities, and many faced confinement in institutions. The IDEA enshrined the right to education for children with disabilities, allowing millions of children to learn in a public-school classroom by setting guidelines for accessibility and the instruction of students with disabilities in American public schools.

Olmstead v. L.C. (1999)

Olmstead v. L.C. (1999) Editor’s Note: The following article contains discussion of terms that, as of 2022, are no longer acceptable for describing people with disabilities. Terms such as "retarded" belong to the people who originally used them and do not reflect the views of the Embryo Project authors and editors.

Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)

Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) In 1990, the United States Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act, or the ADA, which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities by employers, governments, or public accommodations. Following gains made during the civil rights movements of the 1900s, people with disabilities sought similar anti-discrimination legislation. The ADA was the culmination of decades of protest and advocacy from the disability rights movement. After the ADA, federal law protected people with an impairment that limited major life functions like sight or mobility from discrimination. The ADA changed the lives of millions of Americans with disabilities by expanding the opportunities they had to work, travel, and participate in their communities legally protected from discrimination.

"The Role of Urethra in Female Orgasm" (1950), by Ernst Gräfenberg

"The Role of Urethra in Female Orgasm" (1950), by Ernst Gräfenberg

United States v. Georgia (2006)

United States v. Georgia (2006)

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