Ovum

Ovism

<a href="/search?text=Ovism" title="" class="lexicon-term">Ovism</a>

Ovism was one of two models of preformationism, a theory of generation prevalent in the late seventeenth through the end of the eighteenth century. Contrary to the competing theory of epigenesis (gradual emergence of form), preformationism held that the unborn offspring existed fully formed in the eggs or

Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777)

<a href="/search?text=Albrecht%20von%20Haller" title="" class="lexicon-term">Albrecht von Haller</a>

Victor Albrecht von Haller was an 18th century scientist who did extensive work in the life sciences, including anatomy and physiology, botany, and developmental biology. His embryological work consisted of experiments in understanding the process of generation, and led him to adopt the model of preformationism called

An Atlas of Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (1895), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

An Atlas of Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (1895), by <a href="/search?text=Edmund%20Beecher%20Wilson" title="" class="lexicon-term">Edmund Beecher Wilson</a>

Edmund Beecher Wilson in the US published An Atlas of Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (hereafter called An Atlas) in 1895. The book presents photographs by photographer

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