Reproduction

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (1929–1970)

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (1929–1970)

Starting in 1929, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists was a professional association of physicians in the UK that aimed to improve the care of women in childbirth through training and education and to establish obstetrics and gynecology as a medical specialty. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has contributed to women's reproductive health by fostering research,

“Pelvic Scoring for Elective Induction” (1964), by Edward Bishop

“Pelvic Scoring for Elective Induction” (1964), by Edward Bishop

In the 1964 article "Pelvic Scoring for Elective Induction," obstetrician Edward Bishop describes his method to determine whether a doctor should induce labor, or artificially start the birthing process, in a pregnant woman. Aside from medical emergencies, a woman can elect to induce labor to choose when she gives birth and have a shorter than normal labor.

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