MMR vaccine

Serial Cultivation of Human Diploid Cells in the Lab (1958–1961) by Leonard Hayflick and Paul S. Moorhead

Serial Cultivation of Human Diploid Cells in the Lab (1958–1961), by <a href="/search?text=Leonard%20Hayflick" title="" class="lexicon-term">Leonard Hayflick</a> and Paul S. Moorhead

From 1958 to 1961, Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead in the US developed a way in the laboratory to cultivate strains of human cells

Stanley Alan Plotkin (1932– )

Stanley Alan Plotkin (1932– )

Stanley Alan Plotkin developed vaccines in the United States during the mid to late twentieth century. Plotkin began his research career at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he studied the rubella virus. In pregnant women, the rubella virus caused congenital rubella syndrome in the fetus, which led to various

Maurice Ralph Hilleman (1919–2005)

Maurice Ralph Hilleman (1919–2005)

Maurice Ralph Hilleman developed vaccines at the Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research in West Point, Pennsylvania, during the twentieth century. Over the course of his career at Merck, Hilleman created over forty vaccines, making him one of the most prolific developers of vaccine in the twentieth century. Of the fourteen vaccines commonly given to children in the US by 2015, Hilleman was

The Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

The Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine

In 1971 Maurice Hillemanat at the Merck Institute of Therapeutic Research, a pharmaceutical company in West Point, Pennsylvania, created the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The vaccine combined three separate vaccines for measles, mumps, and rubella, common and sometimes fatal diseases. Measles causes a red skin rash and severe fevers that can be fatal. Mumps causes fever and swelling of the

Stanley Alan Plotkin's Development of a Rubella Vaccine (1969)

Stanley Alan Plotkin's Development of a Rubella Vaccine (1969)

In the US during the late 1960s, Stanley Alan Plotkin, John D. Farquhar, Michael Katz, and Fritz Buser isolated a strain of the infectious disease rubella and developed a rubella vaccine with a weakened, or attenuated, version of the virus strain. Rubella, also called German measles, is a highly contagious disease caused by the rubella virus that generally causes mild rashes and fever. However, in

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