Human anatomy

Body Worlds

<a href="/search?text=Body%20Worlds" title="" class="lexicon-term">Body Worlds</a>

Body Worlds is an exhibition featuring plastinates, human bodies that have been preserved using a plastination process. First displayed in 1995 in Tokyo, Japan, this collection of anatomical specimens has since been displayed around the world.

Human Evolution Inferred from Tooth Growth and Development

Human Evolution Inferred from Tooth Growth and Development

To study human evolution, researchers sometimes use microstructures found in human teeth and their knowledge of the processes by which those structures grow. Human fetuses begin to develop teeth in utero. As teeth grow, they form a hard outer substance, called enamel, through a process called amelogenesis. During amelogenesis, incremental layers of enamel form in a Circadian rhythm.

Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731)

<a href="/search?text=Frederik%20Ruysch" title="" class="lexicon-term">Frederik Ruysch</a> (1638–1731)

Frederik Ruysch made anatomical drawings and collected and preserved human specimens, many of which were infants and fetuses, in the Netherlands during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Ruysch had many interests, including anatomy, botany, and medicine, and he discovered structures of the lymphatic system and of the eye.

The Cabinet of Frederik Ruysch

The Cabinet of <a href="/search?text=Frederik%20Ruysch" title="" class="lexicon-term">Frederik Ruysch</a>

Frederik Ruysch’s cabinet of curiosities, commonly referred to simply as the Cabinet, was a museum Ruysch created in the Netherlands in the late 1600s. The Cabinet filled a series of small houses that Ruysch rented in Amsterdam, and they contained greater than 2,000 specimens, including preserved fetuses and infants.

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