Heredity

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on Sea-squirts in the Early Twentieth Century

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on Sea-squirts in the Early Twentieth Century

In the early twentieth century, Paul Kammerer, a zoologist working at the Vivarium in Vienna, Austria, experimented on sea-squirts (Ciona intestinalis). Kammerer claimed that results from his experiments demonstrated that organisms could transmit characteristics that they had acquired in their lifetimes to their offspring.

The Germ-Plasm: a Theory of Heredity (1893), by August Weismann

The Germ-Plasm: a Theory of <a href="/search?text=Heredity" title="" class="lexicon-term">Heredity</a> (1893), by <a href="/search?text=August%20Weismann" title="" class="lexicon-term">August Weismann</a>

Friedrich Leopold August Weismann published Das Keimplasma: eine Theorie der Vererbung (The Germ-Plasm: a Theory of Heredity, hereafter The Germ-Plasm) while

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on the Midwife Toad (1905-1910)

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on the Midwife Toad (1905-1910)

In the first decade of the twentieth century, Paul Kammerer, a zoologist working at the Vivarium in Vienna, Austria, conducted research on developmental mechanisms, including a series of breeding experiments on toads (Alytes obstetricans). Kammerer claimed that his results demonstrated that organisms could transmit acquired characteristics to their offspring.

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on Salamanders (1903-1912)

Paul Kammerer's Experiments on Salamanders (1903-1912)

In the early twentieth century, Paul Kammerer conducted a series of experiments to demonstrate that organisms could transmit characteristics acquired in their lifetimes to their offspring. In his 1809 publication, zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck had hypothesized that living beings can inherit features their parents or ancestors acquired throughout life.

Paul Kammerer (1880-1926)

Paul Kammerer (1880-1926)

Paul Kammerer conducted experiments on amphibians and marine animals at the Vivarium, a research institute in Vienna, Austria, in the early twentieth century. Kammerer bred organisms in captivity, and he induced them to develop particular adaptations, which Kammerer claimed the organismss offspring would inherit.

The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1900), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

<a href="/search?text=The%20Cell%20in%20Development%20and%20Inheritance" title="" class="lexicon-term">The Cell in Development and Inheritance</a> (1900), by <a href="/search?text=Edmund%20Beecher%20Wilson" title="" class="lexicon-term">Edmund Beecher Wilson</a>

The Cell in Development and Inheritance, by Edmund Beecher Wilson, provided a textb

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