Embryology

Ectoderm

Ectoderm

Ectoderm is one of three germ layers—groups of cells that coalesce early during the embryonic life of all animals except maybe sponges, and from which organs and tissues form. As an embryo develops, a single fertilized cell progresses through multiple rounds of cell division.

General Embryological Information Service, published annually by the Hubrecht Laboratory, 1949-1981

General Embryological Information Service, published annually by the Hubrecht Laboratory, 1949-1981

The General Embryological Information Service (GEIS) was an annual report published by the Hubrecht Laboratory in Utrecht, The Netherlands from 1949 to 1981 that disseminated contemporary research information to developmental biologists. The purpose of the annual report was to catalog the names, addresses, and associated research of every developmental biologist in the world.

Wilhelm Johannsen's Genotype-Phenotype Distinction

Wilhelm Johannsen's Genotype-Phenotype Distinction

Wilhelm Johannsen first proposed the distinction between genotype and phenotype in the study of heredity while working in Denmark in 1909. The distinction is between the hereditary dispositions of organisms (their genotypes) and the ways in which those dispositions manifest themselves in the physical characteristics of those organisms (their phenotypes).

Endoderm

Endoderm

Endoderm is one of the germ layers—aggregates of cells that organize early during embryonic life and from which all organs and tissues develop. All animals, with the exception of sponges, form either two or three germ layers through a process known as gastrulation.

"Experiments on Embryonic Induction III. A Note on Inductions by Chick Primitive Streak Transplanted to the Rabbit Embryo" (1934), by Conrad Hal Waddington

"<a href="/search?text=Experiments%20on%20Embryonic%20Induction%20III.%20A%20Note%20on%20Inductions%20by%20Chick%20Primitive%20Streak%20Transplanted%20to%20the%20Rabbit%20Embryo" title="" class="lexicon-term">Experiments on Embryonic Induction III. A Note on Inductions by Chick Primitive Streak Transplanted to the Rabbit Embryo</a>" (1934) by <a href="/search?text=Conrad%20Hal%20Waddington" title="" class="lexicon-term">Conrad Hal Waddington</a>

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