Sperm

Preformationism in the Enlightenment

<a href="/search?text=Preformationism%20in%20the%20Enlightenment" title="" class="lexicon-term">Preformationism in the Enlightenment</a>

Preformationism was a theory of embryological development used in the late seventeenth through the late eighteenth centuries. This theory held that the generation of offspring occurs as a result of an unfolding and growth of preformed parts. There were two competing models of preformationism: the

Ovism

<a href="/search?text=Ovism" title="" class="lexicon-term">Ovism</a>

Ovism was one of two models of preformationism, a theory of generation prevalent in the late seventeenth through the end of the eighteenth century. Contrary to the competing theory of epigenesis (gradual emergence of form), preformationism held that the unborn offspring existed fully formed in the eggs or

Spermism

<a href="/search?text=Spermism" title="" class="lexicon-term">Spermism</a>

Spermism was one of two models of preformationism, a theory of embryo generation prevalent in the late seventeenth through the end of the eighteenth century. Spermist preformationism was the belief that offspring develop from a tiny fully-formed

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