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Preformationism in the Enlightenment

<a href="/search?text=Preformationism%20in%20the%20Enlightenment" title="" class="lexicon-term">Preformationism in the Enlightenment</a>

Preformationism was a theory of embryological development used in the late seventeenth through the late eighteenth centuries. This theory held that the generation of offspring occurs as a result of an unfolding and growth of preformed parts. There were two competing models of preformationism: the

Ovism

<a href="/search?text=Ovism" title="" class="lexicon-term">Ovism</a>

Ovism was one of two models of preformationism, a theory of generation prevalent in the late seventeenth through the end of the eighteenth century. Contrary to the competing theory of epigenesis (gradual emergence of form), preformationism held that the unborn offspring existed fully formed in the eggs or

Spermism

<a href="/search?text=Spermism" title="" class="lexicon-term">Spermism</a>

Spermism was one of two models of preformationism, a theory of embryo generation prevalent in the late seventeenth through the end of the eighteenth century. Spermist preformationism was the belief that offspring develop from a tiny fully-formed

"Contributions to the Development of the Embryo. On the Artificial Production of One of the First Two Blastomeres, and the Later Development (Postgeneration) of the Missing Half of the Body" (1888), by Wilhelm Roux

"Contributions to the Development of the Embryo. On the Artificial Production of One of the First Two Blastomeres, and the Later Development (Postgeneration) of the Missing Half of the Body." (1888), by <a href="/search?text=Wilhelm%20Roux" title="" class="lexicon-term">Wilhelm Roux</a>

Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger (1829-1910)

Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger (1829-1910)

Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger was a physiologist known for his research on respiration and the respiratory quotient, experiments on the effects of electricity on muscles and nerves, and his study of the ovaries and eggs development. His experiments on how the gravitational orientation of frog eggs affects their cleavage plane inspired embryologists such as

Ovum Humanum: Growth, Maturation, Nourishment, Fertilization and Early Development (1960), by Landrum Brewer Shettles

<a href="/search?text=Ovum%20Humanum" title="" class="lexicon-term">Ovum Humanum</a>: Its Growth, Maturation, Nourishment, Fertilization and Early Development

Ovum Humanum was written and compiled by Dr. Landrum Brewer Shettles while he worked as a doctor in New York. The publication contains an atlas of photographs of the

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