Theories

Dinosaur Egg Parataxonomy

By Paige Madison

Dinosaur egg parataxonomy is a classification system that organizes dinosaur eggs by descriptive features such as shape, size, and shell thickness. Though egg parataxonomy originated in the nineteenth century, Zi-Kui Zhao from Beijing, China, developed a modern parataxonomic system in the late twentieth century. Zhao's system, published in 1975, enabled scientists to organize egg specimens according to observable features, and to communicate their findings.

Created 2015-03-23

Last modified 9 months 3 weeks ago

Format: Articles

Telomerase in Human Development

By Zane Bartlett

Telomerase is an enzyme that regulates the lengths of telomeres in the cells of many organisms, and in humans it begins to function int the early stages of embryonic development. Telomeres are repetitive sequences of DNA on the ends of chromosomes that protect chromosomes from sticking to each other or tangling. In 1989, Gregg Morin found that telomerase was present in human cells. In 1996, Woodring Wright and his team examined human embryonic cells and found that telomerase was active in them. Scientists manipulate telomerase in cells to give cells the capacity to replicate infinitely.

Created 2015-03-23

Last modified 2 years 4 months ago

Format: Articles

The Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics (1924), by Paul Kammerer

By Federica Turriziani Colonna

The Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics is a book published in 1924, written by Paul Kammerer, who studied developmental biology in Vienna, Austria, in the early twentieth century. The Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics summarizes Kammerer's experiments, and explains their significance. In his book, Kammerer aims to explain how offspring inherit traits from their parents. Some scholars criticized Kammerer's reports and interpretations, arguing that they were inaccurate and misleading, while others supported Kammerer's work.

Created 2015-03-31

Last modified 2 years 3 months ago

Format: Articles

Study of Fossilized Massospondylus Dinosaur Embryos from South Africa (1978-2012)

By Paige Madison

In 1978, James Kitching discovered two dinosaur embryos in a road-cut talus at Roodraai (Red Bend) in Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa. Kitching assigned the fossilized embryos to the species of long necked herbivores Massospondylus carinatus (longer vertebra) from the Early Jurassic period, between 200 and 183 million years ago. The embryos were partially visible but surrounded by eggshell and rock, called matrix. Kitching said that the eggs were too delicate to remove from the matrix without damage.

Created 2015-03-31

Last modified 2 years 3 months ago

Format: Articles

The Y-Chromosome in Animals

By Dorothy R. Haskett

The Y-chromosome is one of a pair of chromosomes that determine the genetic sex of individuals in mammals, some insects, and some plants. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the development of new microscopic and molecular techniques, including DNA sequencing, enabled scientists to confirm the hypothesis that chromosomes determine the sex of developing organisms. In an adult organism, the genes on the Y-chromosome help produce the male gamete, the sperm cell. Beginning in the 1980s, many studies of human populations used the Y-chromosome gene sequences to trace paternal lineages.

Created 2015-05-28

Last modified 2 years 1 month ago

Format: Articles

ABO Blood Type Identification and Forensic Science (1900-1960)

By Corey Harbison

The use of blood in forensic analysis is a method for identifying individuals suspected of committing some kinds of crimes. Paul Uhlenhuth and Karl Landsteiner, two scientists working separately in Germany in the early twentieth century, showed that there are differences in blood between individuals. Uhlenhuth developed a technique to identify the existence of antibodies, and Landsteiner and his students showed that humans had distinctly different blood types called A, B, AB, and O.

Created 2016-06-02

Last modified 5 months 2 days ago

Format: Articles

Estrogen and the Menstrual Cycle in Humans

By Brendan Van Iten

Estrogen is the primary sex hormone in women and it functions during the reproductive menstrual cycle. Women have three major types of estrogen: estrone, estradiol, and estriol, which bind to and activate receptors within the body. Researchers discovered the three types of estrogen over a period of seven years, contributing to more detailed descriptions of the menstrual cycle. Each type of estrogen molecule contains a slightly different arrangement or number of atoms that in turn causes some of the estrogens to be more active than others.

Created 2016-06-22

Last modified 1 year 1 month ago

Format: Articles

The Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in Vertebrates 

By Dorothy Regan Haskett

The hedgehog signaling pathway is a mechanism that regulates cell growth and differentiation during embryonic development, called embryogenesis, in animals. The hedgehog signaling pathway works both between cells and within individual cells.

Created 2016-06-27

Last modified 1 year 4 weeks ago

Format: Articles

Fruit Fly Life Cycle

By Amy Pribadi

Object is a digital image of fruit flies, showing how they develop through stages of egg, larva, pupa, and adult. The image has a magnification box on parts of the larvae. The box displays imaginal disc, which eventually develop into the adult body parts.

Fruit flies of the species Drosophila melanogaster develop from eggs to adults in eight to ten days at 25 degrees Celsius. They develop through four primary stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. When in the wild, female flies lay their fertilized eggs in rotting fruit or other decomposing material that can serve as food for the larvae. In the lab, fruit flies lay their fertilized eggs in a mixture of agar, molasses, cornmeal, and yeast. After roughly a day, each egg hatches into a larva.

Created 2016-10-11

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Graphics

Beadle's One Gene-One Enzyme Hypothesis

By Amy Pribadi

Object is a digital image with two panes, one on top of the other, both of which picture the area within a cell between the nucleus and the cell membrane. The top pane represent three genes within the cell nucleus, each of which produces a distinct kind of enzyme outside of the nucleus. Those enzymes then function in three distinct kinds of metabolic reactions. The bottom pane represents the same situation, except the second gene is damaged by x-rays and can't produce its enzymes. As a result, two of the three metabolic reactions fail to happen.

Between 1934 and 1945, George Beadle developed a hypothesis that each gene within the chromosomes of organisms each produced one enzyme. Enzymes are types of proteins that can catalyze reactions inside cells, and the figure shows that each enzyme controls a stage in a series of biochemical reactions. The top box in this figure represents a normal process of enzyme production and biochemical reactions, and the bottom box shows how Beadle's experiments affected the normal biochemical process.

Created 2016-10-12

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Graphics

Neurospora crassa Life Cycle

By Amy Pribadi

Object is a digital image with two parts that together show the Neurospora life cycle. The left part shows the asexual reproductive cycle of the mold. The right part shows the sexual reproductive cycle of the mold.

This diagram shows the life cycle of Neurospora crassa, a mold that grows on bread. N. crassa can reproduce through an asexual cycle or a sexual cycle. The asexual cycle (colored as a purple circle), begins in this figure with (1a) vegetative mycelium, which are strands of mature fungus. Some of the strands form bulbs (2a) in a process called conidiation. From those bulbs develop the conidia, which are spores. Next, (3a) a single conidium separates from its strand and elongates until it forms mycelium.

Created 2016-10-12

Last modified 1 month 2 days ago

Format: Graphics

Beadle and Tatum's 1941 Experiments with Neurospora Revealed that Genes Produce Enzymes

By Amy Pribadi

Object is a digital image that depicts four stages in Beadle and Tatum's Neurospora experiments. Each stage is depicted in a separate section, with different test tubes in each section.

This illustration shows George Beadle and Edward Tatum's experiments with Neurospora crassa that indicated that single genes produce single enzymes. The pair conducted the experiments at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. Enzymes are types of proteins that can catalyze reactions inside cells, reactions that produce a number of things, including nutrients that the cell needs. Neurospora crassa is a species of mold that grows on bread.

Created 2016-10-12

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Graphics

Chloroplasts

By Anna Guerrero

Object is a digital image of a chloroplast. There are two boxes, one atop the other. In the top box is an image of a chloroplast, which is roughly ovoid. A scale bar indicates that the chloroplast is roughly 5 micrometers in length. The outer membrane is colored light green, and the inner membrane is a different shade of light green. The top right parts of the outer and inner membranes are cut away to reveal dozens thylakoids within, which are all dark green and look like tires. They are stacked on top of each other to form ten granums.

Chloroplasts are the organelles in plant and algal cells that conduct photosynthesis. A single chloroplast has an outer membrane and an inner membrane, with an intermembrane space in between. Within the inner membrane, interconnected stacks of thylakoids, called granum, float in a protein rich fluid called the stroma. These thylakoid stacks contain chlorophyll, a pigment which converts sunlight into usable energy for plants and free oxygen from water. The stacks are sites of light reactions within a plant cell.

Created 2017-02-06

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Graphics

Mitochondria

By Anna Guerrero

Object is a digital image of a mitochondrion. There are two boxes, one atop of the other. In the top box is the mitochondrion with a scale bar that indicates that the organelle is 1 micrometer in length. The image depicts the mitochondrion�s outer membrane, which is roughly ovoid in shape and is colored a transparent orange to reveal the inner membrane within, colored red. The top left quarter of the outer membrane and the inner membrane are cut away to reveal the cristae. In the bottom box is a round animal cell, colored teal.

Mitochondria are organelles found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They are composed of an outer membrane and an inner membrane. The outer membrane faces the cellular cytoplasm, while the inner membrane folds back on itself multiple times, forming inner folds, called cristae. The space between the two membrane layers is called the intermembrane space, and the space within the inner membrane is called the matrix.

Created 2017-02-06

Last modified 1 month 4 days ago

Format: Graphics

DNA and X and Y Chromosomes

By Anna Guerrero

Object is a digital image that represents how DNA partly constitutes a Y-chromosome. Image shows different parts of an unbroken strand that begins with the smallest parts on the left side of the image, and eventually forms the Y-chromosome on the right side of the image, so that the chromosome looks like a kite with a long tail. On the left side of the image, a DNA double helix is enlarged to reveal the paired nucleotides within. The width of the helix is 2 nanometers. As the helix continues to the right, it bends downwards, and it gets smaller and seemingly further way from the viewer.

Y-chromosomes exist in the body cells of many kinds of male animals. Found in the nucleus of most living animal cells, the X and Y-chromosomes are condensed structures made of DNA wrapped around proteins called histones. The individual histones bunch into groups that the coiled DNA wraps around called a nucleosome, which are roughly 10 nano-meters (nm) across. The histones bunch together to form a helical fiber (30 nm) that spins into a supercoil (200 nm). During much of a cell's life, DNA exists in the 200 nm supercoil phase.

Created 2017-02-06

Last modified 1 month 4 days ago

Format: Graphics

Jelly Fish and Green Fluorescent Protein

By Anna Guerrero

Object is a digital image that represents green fluorescent protein at various levels of organization within an organism. On the left of the image is a blue circle, in which there is a jelly fish, with some of its parts aglow. From one such part, a zoom circle juts to the right, in which is represented a strand of DNA from the jelly fish. From that circle, a black arrow points to the right and to a new zoom circle, this one representing the primary amino acid sequence coded for by the DNA sequence and that eventually folds into the protein.

The crystal jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, produces and emits light, called bioluminescence. Its DNA codes for sequence of 238 amino acids that forms a protein called Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). FP is folded so that a part of the protein, called the chromophore, is located in the center of the protein. The chemical structure of the chromophore emits a green fluorescence when exposed to light in the range of blue to ultraviolet.

Created 2017-02-06

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Graphics

Paternal Sperm Telomere Elongation and Its Impact on Offspring Fitness

By Zane Bartlett, Joanna Yang

Telomeres are structures at the ends of DNA strands that get longer in the DNA of sperm cells as males age. That phenomenon is different for most other types of cells, for which telomeres get shorter as organisms age. In 1992, scientists showed that telomere length (TL) in sperm increases with age in contrast to most cell of most other types. Telomeres are the protective caps at the end of DNA strands that preserve chromosomal integrity and contribute to DNA length and stability.

Created 2017-02-07

Last modified 2 months 2 weeks ago

Format: Articles

Julia Barlow Platt's Embryological Observations on Salamanders' Cartilage (1893)

By Karina Ramirez

In 1893, Julia Barlow Platt published her research on the origins of cartilage in the developing head of the common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) embryo. The mudpuppy is an aquatic salamander commonly used by embryologists because its large embryonic cells and nuclei are easy to see. Platt followed the paths of cells in developing mudpuppy embryos to see how embryonic cells migrated during the formation of the head. With her research, Platt challenged then current theories about germ layers, the types of cells in an early embryo that develop into adult cells.

Created 2017-03-06

Last modified 4 months 2 weeks ago

Format: Articles

"Testing the Kin Selection Theory: Who Controls the Investments?" from The Ants (1990), by Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson

By Kelle Dhein

In “Testing the Kin Selection Theory: Who Controls the Investments?” Bert Hölldobler and Edward Osborne Wilson discussed the predictive power of kin selection theory, a theory about the evolution of social behaviors. As part of Hölldobler's and Wilson's 1990 book titled The Ants, Hölldobler and Wilson compared predictions about the reproductive practices of ants to data about the reproductive practices of ants. They showed that the data generally supported the expected behaviors proposed by kin selection theory.

Created 2017-04-18

Last modified 3 months 1 week ago

Format: Articles

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Strains 16 and 18

By Grace Kim

The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18 are the two most common HPV strains that lead to cases of genital cancer. HPV is the most commonly sexually transmitted disease, resulting in more than fourteen million cases per year in the United States alone. When left untreated, HPV leads to high risks of cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, and penile cancers. In 1983 and 1984 in Germany, physician Harald zur Hausen found that two HPV strains, HPV-16 and HPV-18, caused cervical cancer in women. In the early twenty first century, pharmaceutical companies Merck & Co.

Created 2017-05-04

Last modified 2 months 2 weeks ago

Format: Articles

Estrogen

By Brendan Van Iten

This image contains three line-angle formulas of three estrogen molecules: estriol on the left, estradiol in the center, and estrone on the right. The molecules line-angle formulas contain wedged and dashed bonds for three-dimensional geometry or stereochemistry.

The figure depicts three different molecular structures of estrogen found in mammals’ that differ by the arrangement of bonds and side groups. The molecular structures of the three estrogen molecules differ by the arrangement of chemical bonds and side groups attached to the core steroid structure, cholesterol, which contains three cyclohexane rings and one cyclopentane ring.

Created 2017-05-18

Last modified 1 month 4 days ago

Format: Graphics

Apoptosis in Embryonic Development

By Zane Bartlett

Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a mechanism in embryonic development that occurs naturally in organisms. Apoptosis is a different process from cell necrosis, which is uncontrolled cell death usually after infection or specific trauma. As cells rapidly proliferate during development, some of them undergo apoptosis, which is necessary for many stages in development, including neural development, reduction in egg cells (oocytes) at birth, as well as the shaping of fingers and vestigial organs in humans and other animals. Sydney Brenner, H. Robert Horvitz, and John E.

Created 2017-06-08

Last modified 1 month 2 weeks ago

Format: Articles

The Neuron Doctrine (1860-1895)

By Isra Mishqat

The neuron doctrine is a concept formed during the turn of the twentieth century that describes the properties of neurons, the specialized cells that compose the nervous system. The neuron doctrine was one of two major theories on the composition of the nervous system at the time. Advocates of the neuron doctrine claimed that the nervous system was composed of discrete cellular units. Proponents of the alternative reticular theory, on the other hand, argued that the entire nervous system was a continuous network of cells, without gaps or synapses between the cells.

Created 2017-06-15

Last modified 1 month 1 week ago

Format: Articles

The Formation of Reticular Theory

By Isra Mishqat

In the nineteenth century, reticular theory aimed to describe the properties of neurons, the specialized cells which make up the nervous system, but was later disconfirmed by evidence. Reticular theory stated that the nervous system was composed of a continuous network of specialized cells without gaps (synapses), and was first proposed by researcher Joseph von Gerlach in Germany in 1871.

Created 2017-06-19

Last modified 1 month 5 days ago

Format: Articles

Interspecies SCNT-derived Humanesque Blastocysts

By Sarah Taddeo, Jason S. Robert, Nicole Diehnelt

Since the 1950s, scientists have developed interspecies blastocysts in laboratory settings, but not until the 1990s did proposals emerge to engineer interspecies blastocysts that contained human genetic or cellular material. Even if these embryos were not permitted to mature to fetal stages, their ethical and political status became debated within nations attempting to use them for research.

Created 2017-06-23

Last modified 3 weeks 5 days ago

Format: Articles

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Strains 16 and 18

By Grace Kim

The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18 are the two most common HPV strains that lead to cases of genital cancer. HPV is the most commonly sexually transmitted disease, resulting in more than fourteen million cases per year in the United States alone. When left untreated, HPV leads to high risks of cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, and penile cancers. In 1983 and 1984 in Germany, physician Harald zur Hausen found that two HPV strains, HPV-16 and HPV-18, caused cervical cancer in women. In the early twenty first century, pharmaceutical companies Merck & Co.

Created 2017-07-19

Last modified 5 days 6 hours ago

Format: Articles

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