Search

Displaying 1 - 25 of 275 items.

Pages

Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866-1945)

Although best known for his work with the fruit fly, for which he earned a Nobel Prize and the title "The Father of Genetics," Thomas Hunt Morgan's contributions to biology reach far beyond genetics. His research explored questions in embryology, regeneration, evolution, and heredity, using a variety of approaches.

Format: Articles

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan

Cropped portrait of Thomas Hunt Morgan

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters

Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Lillian and Isabel

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters

Thomas Hunt Morgan with daughters Lillian and Isabel

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Isabel and Thomas Hunt Morgan

Isabel (back) and Thomas Hunt Morgan at Schemaerhorn Hall at Columbia University

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan

Thomas Hunt Morgan portrait as above but seated in the opposite direction

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan

Portrait of Morgan with glasses reading papers, not looking at camera

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan

Portrait of Morgan as above but without reading glasses and looking at camera

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University

Thomas Hunt Morgan portrait

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University

Thomas Hunt Morgan sitting reading papers at Columbia

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Portrait of Thomas Hunt Morgan at microscope

Portrait of Thomas Hunt Morgan at microscope

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan, looking into camera, paper in hand

Thomas Hunt Morgan portrait

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan's Definition of Regeneration: Morphallaxis and Epimorphosis

For Thomas Hunt Morgan clarity was of utmost importance. He was therefore frustrated with the many disparate, disconnected terms that were used to refer to similar, if not the same, regenerative processes within organisms. When Morgan wrote Regeneration in 1901 there had been many different terms developed and adopted by various investigators to describe their observations. As a result there were many inconsistencies making it difficult to discuss results comparatively and also making it more challenging to generalize. Defining terms was a priority for Morgan.

Format: Articles

Subject: Theories

Backyard of Thomas Hunt Morgan's home in Woods Hole

Morgan's house, backyard

Format: Photographs

Subject: Places

Thomas Hunt Morgan, E.B. Wilson and others having a picnic

TH Morgan, EB Wilson and others on rocky beach having a picnic. Morgan in center, Wilson on right with teacup.

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

“Sex Limited Inheritance in Drosophila” (1910), by Thomas Hunt Morgan

In 1910, Thomas Hunt Morgan performed an experiment at Columbia University, in New York City, New York, that helped identify the role chromosomes play in heredity. That year, Morgan was breeding Drosophila, or fruit flies. After observing thousands of fruit fly offspring with red eyes, he obtained one that had white eyes. Morgan began breeding the white-eyed mutant fly and found that in one generation of flies, the trait was only present in males.

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments, Publications

Thomas Hunt Morgan, children & friends at the Grand Central Station

Thomas Hunt Morgan, children & friends at the Grand Central Station in New York City waiting for train to Woods Hole

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Calvin Blackman Bridges (1889-1938)

Calvin Blackman Bridges studied chromosomes and heredity in the US throughout the early twentieth century. Bridges performed research with Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University in New York City, New York, and at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. Bridges and Morgan studied heredity in Drosophila, the common fruit fly. Throughout the early twentieth century, researchers were gathering evidence that genes, or what Gregor Mendel had called the factors that control heredity, are located on chromosomes.

Format: Articles

Subject: People

Alfred Henry Sturtevant (1891–1970)

Alfred Henry Sturtevant studied heredity in fruit flies in the US throughout the twentieth century. From 1910 to 1928, Sturtevant worked in Thomas Hunt Morgan’s research lab in New York City, New York. Sturtevant, Morgan, and other researchers established that chromosomes play a role in the inheritance of traits. In 1913, as an undergraduate, Sturtevant created one of the earliest genetic maps of a fruit fly chromosome, which showed the relative positions of genes along the chromosome.

Format: Articles

Subject: People

"The linear arrangement of six sex-linked factors in drosophila, as shown by their mode of association” (1913), by Alfred Henry Sturtevant

In 1913, Alfred Henry Sturtevant published the results of experiments in which he showed how genes are arranged along a chromosome. Sturtevant performed those experiments as an undergraduate at Columbia University, in New York, New York, under the guidance of Nobel laureate Thomas Hunt Morgan. Sturtevant studied heredity using Drosophila, the common fruit fly. In his experiments, Sturtevant determined the relative positions of six genetic factors on a fly’s chromosome by creating a process called gene mapping.

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments, Publications

Calvin Bridges’ Experiments on Nondisjunction as Evidence for the Chromosome Theory of Heredity (1913-1916)

From 1913 to 1916, Calvin Bridges performed experiments that indicated genes are found on chromosomes. His experiments were a part of his doctoral thesis advised by Thomas Hunt Morgan in New York, New York. In his experiments, Bridges studied Drosophila, the common fruit fly, and by doing so showed that a process called nondisjunction caused chromosomes, under some circumstances, to fail to separate when forming sperm and egg cells. Nondisjunction, as described by Bridges, caused sperm or egg cells to contain abnormal amounts of chromosomes.

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments, Publications

G. Thomas

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

"Transplantation of Living Nuclei from Blastula Cells into Enucleated Frogs' Eggs" (1952), by Robert Briggs and Thomas J. King

In 1952 Robert Briggs and Thomas J. King published their article, "Transplantation of Living Nuclei from Blastula Cells into Enucleated Frogs' Eggs," in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the culmination of a series of experiments conducted at the Institute for Cancer Research and Lankenau Hospital Research Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In this paper Briggs and King examined whether nuclei of embryonic cells are differentiated, and by doing so, were the first to conduct a successful nuclear transplantation with amphibian embryos.

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments

Reid Hunt

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Embryology Course Photograph, 2010

Faculty and students in the 2010 Embryology Course at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Pages