Search

Displaying 1 - 25 of 92 items.

Pages

Edmund Beecher Wilson (1856-1939)

Edmund Beecher Wilson contributed to cell biology, the study of cells, in the US during the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. His three editions of The Cell in Development and Inheritance (or Heredity) in 1896, 1900, and 1925 introduced generations of students to cell biology. In The Cell, Wilson described the evidence and theories of his time about cells and identified topics for future study. He helped show how each part of the cell works during cell division and in every step of early development of an organism.

Format: Articles

Subject: People

Edmund Beecher Wilson

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Edmund Beecher Wilson

image/tif black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Edmund Beecher Wilson and Huettner son

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1900), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

The Cell in Development and Inheritance, by Edmund Beecher Wilson, provided a textbook introduction to cell biology for generations of biologists in the twentieth century. In his book, Wilson integrated information about development, inheritance, chromosomes, organelles, and the structure and functions of cells. First published in 1896, the book started with 371 pages, grew to 483 pages in the second edition that appeared in 1900, and expanded to 1,231 pages by the third and final edition in 1925.

Format: Articles

Subject: Publications

An Atlas of Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (1895), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

Edmund Beecher Wilson in the US published An Atlas of Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (hereafter called An Atlas) in 1895. The book presents photographs by photographer Edward Leaming that capture stages of fertilization, the fusion of sperm and egg and early development of sea urchin (Toxopneustes variegatus) ova, or egg cell. Prior to An Atlas, no one photographed of eggcell division in clear detail. Wilson obtained high quality images of egg cells by cutting the cells into thin sections and preserving them throughout different stages of development.

Format: Articles

Subject: Publications, Reproduction

Amphioxus, and the Mosaic Theory of Development (1893), by Edmund Beecher Wilson

Edmund Beecher Wilson experimented with Amphioxus (Branchiostoma) embryos in 1892 to identify what caused their cells to differentiate into new types of cells during the process of development. Wilson shook apart the cells at early stages of embryonic development, and he observed the development of the isolated cells. He observed that in the normal development of Amphioxus, all three main types of symmetry, or cleavage patterns observed in embryos, could be found. Wilson proposed a hypothesis that reformed the Mosaic Theory associated with Wilhelm Roux in Germany.

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments

Experimental Studies on Germinal Localization (1904), by Edmund B. Wilson

At the turn of the twentieth century, Edmund B. Wilson
performed experiments to show where germinal
matter was located in molluscs. At Columbia University in New York City,
New York, Wilson studied what causes cells to differentiate during
development. In 1904 he conducted his experiments on molluscs, and he modified the
theory about the location of germinal matter in the succeeding years. Wilson and others modified the
theory of germinal localization to accommodate results that showed

Format: Articles

Subject: Experiments

E.B. Wilson portrait with glasses

E.B. Wilson portrait with glasses

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B. Wilson reading a book

Dr. Wilson at desk with papers

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B. Wilson and unknown man

E.B. Wilson (r) and unknown man on left

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B.Wilson with daughter Nancy

Wilson on left playing cello and Nancy at piano, both looking at camera

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B. Wilson at Columbia University

E.B. Wilson portrait with microscope

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B. Wilson at Columbia University

E.B. Wilson portrait with microscope looking at camera

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Wilson with Huettner sons

E.B. Wilson with Richard (L) and Robert (R) Huettner

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E. B. Wilson with Richard & Robert Huettner

Dr. E. B. Wilson - 1929 Richard (L) and Robert (R) Huettner. Photographed in rear of Crane Building. Wison was using crutches as he suffered from severe arthritis in his later life

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

E.B. Wilson reading a book, different pose

Dr. Wilson at desk with papers

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Thomas Hunt Morgan, E.B. Wilson and others having a picnic

TH Morgan, EB Wilson and others on rocky beach having a picnic. Morgan in center, Wilson on right with teacup.

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

J. W. Wilson

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Edmund Vincent Cowdry

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Edmund Vincent Cowdry

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Charles B. Wilson

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass. 1935

1 black and white video; sound (musical accompaniment only); reformatted digital

By the 1930s, the MBL had become "the" place to go during the summer for biological research and training. Luminaries such as Frank Lillie, Edmund Beecher Wilson, Edwin Grant Conklin, and Thomas Hunt Morgan took their students, packed up their families and research labs, and headed to the MBL. They worked in labs, ate together in the Mess, and they often lived in the limited on-campus housing. Life at the MBL was a life where fun, family, and science intertwined. This film, taken in 1935 by B. R. Coonfield of Brooklyn College, captures snippets of life at the MBL.

Format: Video

Allan Charles Wilson (1934-1991)

Allan C. Wilson studied genes, proteins, and body structures of animals and humans in the US during the second half of the twentieth century. Wilson also studied human evolution. Although morphology and behaviors of humans (Homo sapiens) and great apes differ, Wilson found that they have biochemical and genetic similarities. Wilson and his colleagues calculated the time period of humans' and African apes' common ancestor.

Format: Articles

Subject: People

Nancy Wilson at the microscope

Nancy Wilson looking through microscope

Format: Photographs

Subject: People

Pages